Weigh Safe 2-Ball Mount with Built-In Scale Review

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Review of the Weigh Safe 2-Ball Mount with Built-In Scale


Today we're going to be taking a look at the Weigh-Safe line of adjustable aluminum ball mounts with built-in tongue weight scale, available in multiple configurations right here at Etrailer.com. Now a very common problem that we have that can sometimes make trailering unsafe is not having a proper load-out on our trailer or not having the appropriate tongue weight on the front. This gives us a really good example of it. We just picked this equipment up from the rental company, kind of tested it out to see how they load their trailer. This is a 9,000 pound combined load and it only has 350 pounds worth of tongue weight. Essentially what that means is that we've got too much weight too far back on the trailer. You can even see it here in the wheel wells with just a little bit of area here and you can see there's a lot more here in the front. That's putting a lot of excess strain and a lot of excess pressure on the tire and the rear axle.

That will cause this axle to wear out prematurely. Also if we don't have the appropriate amount of tongue weight pushing down on the rear of the vehicle it's not going to handle properly. We're not going to have the weight down on those rear tires to help us come to a stop quickly and safely. Another side affect of tongue weight not being heavy enough or not having enough downward pressure on that front end is that we can sometimes have sway behind our trailer. If you've ever seen a camper or a trailer going down the road improperly loaded you'll see it bouncing side to side. It's just not a safe situation. Weigh-Safe's got a great solution for that.

That's going to be our Weigh-Safe ball mount with built-in tongue weight scale. We've got a ball here. These are going to come in 2 or 2-5/16". It's going to press down on the hydraulic scale which is then going to register right here and let us know exactly how much tongue weight we have. As you can see this rental company gave us this trailer exactly how it sits and it's only at 350 pounds. To safely haul this any kind of distance at all we would need to reload this trailer and get appropriate tongue weight up here to the front.

Now the goal that you're looking for with tongue weight is going to be 10 to 15% of the total trailer weight. With this being 9,000 pounds worth of trailer we need to be somewhere between 900 pounds and 1,350 pounds. Now you'll see as we load up our trailer we'll just have somebody to keep on eye on our scale. As soon as it gets within the range that we're looking for, in that 10 to 15% mark, we'll know we've got our trailer loaded properly, we're ready to secure that load we'll head down the road much more safely than what it was before. Here you'll see our trailer properly loaded. You can see we've got about equal gaps with this front and this rear tire. It's going to help extend the life of all the components on our trailer and really going to improve the handling of that truck as we head down the highway. Now another common problem that we often see with trailering is when we have too much tongue weight.

It's going to give us kind of the opposite reaction of what we had before, putting a lot of that stress on this front axle now, going to do unnecessary wear on the tire, also build up a lot of friction in those springs, but where it transfers and where it's going to be apparent the most is when we have too much tongue weight on our trailer and we look at the truck. We're going to have a lot of squat here in the rear end, puts a lot of strain on that rear suspension on those rear tires, and it also draws the front end of the truck up. As it does that we're going to change the angle of our headlights so they're not going to be pointing exactly where we want them. Also it takes some of the weight off those fronts tires so steering and stability are going to be changed a little bit, also braking performance. Another issue we'll have a we had too much tongue weight is the tire wear. The suspension geometry is going to change and the outer edge of those tires is going to wear out much quicker than they should. This one we we're looking at is the 4" compared to the 6" drop that we looked at before, but it's going to tell us we've got approximately a 3,000 pound trailer load here so we want to be somewhere between 300 and 450 pounds of tongue weight. Now we can load up our UTV and know that we're safely going to be with him the right specifications of our ball mount. The shank portion itself here, this is going to be aluminum machined out of one solid piece. We're not going to have to worry about wells or any areas where we might have fatiguing or cracks. The main body of the ball mount itself, or the, actually, area the ball's going to ride in, that's again machined out of one solid piece of aluminum. Each of our pins are going to be constructed out of high-grade aluminum as well as the plate surrounding the lock. Then we've got our lock core. That's constructed out of stainless steel. That's going to keep it working good for a long time to come. We've got our pins here. We just want to slide these out. The nice thing about the pins is they're one unit. We don't have to worry about two different pins trying to get them in, trying to get them out. Makes it much simpler to adjust this up and down, and then you can see right inside there we're going to have the pin that actually holds our ball mount in. Then you'll see right down there there's going to be a plunger. That plunger is designed so when we have our ball in place our ball can push down on that. That's then going to register on the scale for us. The hitch balls are a solid one-piece stainless steel construction. That's going to give us superior corrosion resistance. Also the plunger at the base is made of the same material. You might have a little bit of a concern with the mix of stainless steel and aluminum. Weigh-Safe has thought about that and on the aluminum they've put a galvanic coating on there. That's going to prevent our stainless steel and our aluminum from causing each other to corrode. It's really nice. As you can see they've really put a lot of energy into giving us the highest grade materials that are available, giving us a very strong yet lightweight corrosion-resistant product. That's why they're going to offer you the limited lifetime warranty regardless of where the point of failure might be, which we haven't seen yet but if it does happen send it right back to them. Another great thing, these are made right here in the United States so you know that you're having somebody that takes pride in their work, they're doing a good job to get you something to work that's going to work very effectively. Now regardless of the size in drop or in shank that we decide on, the ball mount's going to come with both the 2" and the 2-5/16" ball mounts. Now if you decide that you need 1-7/8", this is part number WSBL. Now as we go up in size the weight capacities are going to become greater. Now for the 1-7/8" we're going to have a 7,500 pound maximum gross trailer weight capacity whether we're using the 2" shank or the 2-1/2" shank. When we move into the 2" ball that's going to go up to 8,000 pounds on either the 2" or a 2-1/2. Now the only slight difference that we have is going to be on the 2-5/16" ball. It's stamped at 14,500 pounds. That's going to be for use with the 2-1/2" shank. If you go to the 2" shank that capacity's going to be limited to 10,000. Now depending on which size shank you're going to use, if you're using the 2-1/2" you'll see the scale's customized for that. Once it gets up to 2,200 pounds, which is the maximum tongue weight rating of the 2-1/2" design it's going to give you that red area. That way you'll know too much tongue weight, we're exceeding the limit of the ball mount. Same thing for our 2" version here. You can see though it's going to be a little bit lower. That's at the 1,500 pound mark. That's the maximum tongue weight rating for the 2" configuration. We don't want to exceed that and it's nice that it's going to give us a visual cue if we do. Now as we put this together what we're going to do is lineup that oblong hole with our pinhole. We can slide that pin in and through. Now we've got, you can see around the ball, just the slightest bit of a tolerance that's been built in right here. That's going to be sure that that ball has room to move up and down and it won't get bound up inside of there. You can see it's a little bit of wiggle room. That's going to allow that scale to work. We'll side the ball mount portion up and on the shank, pick whatever drop it is that you require, simply slide that in and turn it. That's going to keep everything nice and secure. Now a locking hitch pin that we recommend is part number WS06. This comes with both the locking hitch pin and the dual locking pin assembly. This is going to give you a second dual locking pin assembly but this is the perfect solution for having both of your locks keyed alike so you don't have to search for multiple keys. You're making an investment in safety with these and we don't want them to disappear. Now we're going to get a couple quick measurements for you so you know the distance from the center of our pinholes to the center of our ball. This is going to help ensure that this is going to work for your application. We'll start with the 2" shank model. It's going to have two pinholes. The first one here is going to be about 8-3/8" to the center of our ball. The other is going to be around 9-1/2". Now onto the 2-1/2" version. We're going to have about 8-3/4" from the center of our pinhole to the center of our ball. Regardless of the ball size that you're going to use this will not change. Now when it comes time to adjust our drop or our rise it's a very simple process. You'll just take your included key, placed that in, turn it 90 degrees. At that point you'll see our double pin kit. It's going to come right out. We don't have to wrestle with pulling multiple pins or trying to get multiple clips undone like we have to with most adjustable ball mounts. With the pin set up the way it is, the dual pin and all the options that we have, we'll be able to adjust this incrementally all the way from its highest setting here, which would be just about dead even with the receiver tube all the way down to that 4" drop. Once we get the selection in there that we want that pin's just going to slide back in and we can lock it back up. Now for storage of your Weigh-Safe ball mount if you don't want it in the position that you have it here to where it's out, we can also store this underneath the vehicle. With the 4" drop we'll have to invert the ball or have the ball face down. With the 6, 8, or 10 it can be stored in its upright position but essentially we just bring that around to the back side. Get that raised up. Slide our pin in just like that and re-lock it. That's going to really reduce the chance that we're going to knock our leg on it or bump our shin as we're walking by. That's going to complete our look at the Weigh-Safe line of adjustable aluminum ball mounts with built-in tongue weight scale.


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