Rola Hitch Bike Racks Review - 2019 Subaru Crosstrek

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Review of the Rola Hitch Bike Racks on a 2019 Subaru Crosstrek


Colin: Hey everyone, it's Colin here at etrailer. Today we got a 2019 Subaru Crosstrek. We've been test fitting some different hitch-mounted accessories on it, and right now we have the Rola TX-102 bike rack loaded up. Now this is a two-bike hanging-style rack. We'll be able to get two bikes loaded and carry them to and from your destination.Now, how each bike is secured, you can see we've got two rubber straps on our top tube making sure they stay in place in the cradles. It's going to have a third point of contact for each bike.

We have a rubber strap going around the seat post tube. We call that the anti-sway cradle. What that's doing is taking away a lot of the swaying movement. You can see there's still a little bit, but I'm shaking it pretty hard and it's not moving really too much. It's going to help prevent your bikes from swinging and hitting each other when it's fully loaded, and it'll help prevent this first bike from swinging up and making contact with your Subaru.You can see we got a cable lock installed on it right now.

It's going to help be a great theft deterrent so that if want to run into the store or something like that, no one can just come up, remove the straps, and then unload your bikes. Now, we can just simply insert our key that comes with the bike rack all the way. We'll leave the key in there for now. The cable lock actually stores in the center mast of the bike rack right here so that it's right there when you need it, but it's not really going to be in the way at all.Now I'm going to go ahead and unload the bike. Before I do that, I want to show you guys that this can actually tilt away with bikes loaded.

That's not a common thing with hanging-style racks. Usually with hanging-style racks you have to unload the bikes and then tilt it away. Not the case with this one. You can have two bikes loaded and then tilt it away. What we'll do is remove this pin and clip down here.

Want to make sure you have a hand on the frame of your bike rack. Then we can let that hang. We'll tilt it away. You can see it gives you a really nice angle right there so that you have plenty of space to slide in. We can open up our trunk. Plenty of clearance, and we got plenty of space to slide in and grab whatever we might need out of our trunk.When tilting it back up, make sure you're grabbing a hold of the bike rack itself. You don't want to grab the bike that's attached. I'm going to reach through and grab a hold of the center mast, and I'll push it up. Be careful because you can push it more, and it could make contact with your Subaru. So make sure you're really holding onto it. We'll replace pin and clip right there. There we go, now it's locked into place.Now we'll go ahead and unload the bike just by pulling down on these rubber straps. You see it's just basically a hook holding them on. Then back here we'll do the same thing. From there we can unload it. Now wit any hitch-mounted accessory, you are going to have added length to your vehicle. So you always want to keep that in mind for any close quarters situations. Right now with our arms folded up, what we're going to do is measure from the bumper to the outermost point of our rack. It's about 23" added onto the back of our Subaru. Now in a situation where maybe you want to park in your garage, but you still need a little bit more clearance to be able to shut your garage door, instead of removing your bike rack what you can do is pull up on this pin right here, fold the arms down, and then reinsert it. Just like that we've taken away some more length.Now if we go from the bumper to the outermost part, we're at about 13-3/4". We took a good amount of space. Again, any close quarters situations like maybe you're parking in your garage, you want to keep this feature in mind. Again, even without bikes loaded, we can still it away. It's the same process. Again, make sure that you're not letting it go too far up to where it could hit the back of the Subaru. Here we go.Couple other measurements I'm going to get for your guys. First is our ground clearance. At the bottom right here, we'll measure, see what we got there. It's about 13". You shouldn't really run into any issues with bottoming out, especially because we're sitting pretty close to our real axle. Unless you have a really aggressive driveway, I don't see any situation where you're going to risk scraping the bottom of your bike rack on the ground. If we measure from the closest point of our rack to the bumper, it's about 9". There's plenty of space right there. You're not really going to have to worry about it making contact with your Subaru. That is, unless you have this pin removed and you let it fall forward and hit the back. Just make sure you're careful right there.Now let's come down and see how it attaches to our hitch. Now with this Crosstrek, we have an 1-1/4" hitch receiver. But if your Subaru has a 2" hitch receiver, you can still use this bike rack. Basically, they have a patented flip shank system where, once you remove this bolt right here and this bolt on the other side, you can actually take the shank and flip it 180 degrees. Then you how this 2" version starting right here in between these two brackets. Again, if your Subaru has a 2" receiver or maybe you just have another vehicle in your household which has a 2" receiver, you can use this for multiple vehicles and different size hitches.We have a anti-rattle threaded hitch pin that is tightened down with a clip on the other side. That's taking away all that shake and play from our bike rack while we're traveling, so you're not going to hear any rattling around and stuff like that. Thank you all for watching, and I hope this information helped you out, but that's going to do it for our test fit of the Rola TX-102 bike rack on our 2019 Subaru Crosstrek. Here on our test course we'll start by going through the slalom. This is going to show us the side to side action. This simulates turning corners or evasively maneuvering. Once we get to the alternating speed bumps, we'll see the twisting action. This will simulate hitting a curb or a pothole or driving over uneven pavement. Once we get to the full speed bumps, we'll see the up and down action. This will be just like driving in and out a parking lot, parking garage, or driveway.


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