Erickson Removable Motorcycle Wheel Chock Review and Installation

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Review and How to Install the Erickson Removable Motorcycle Wheel Chock


Adam: What's going on, everybody Adam here with etrailer. Today, we're going to be taking a look at the Erickson Removable Motorcycle Wheel Chock. You're going to benefit from these wheel chocks in a couple of different ways. One, whenever you're strapping down your bike, it's always a problem whenever your front wheel is trying to turn while you're strapping everything up. Of course, we have straps going from the far right and the far left of our handlebar. So if we tighten down one, it's going to want to turn.

So with this, it's going to keep it nice and confined inside of the chock. Another thing is usually I go ahead and take the front of my tire and push it all the way up against these shelves right behind you, but then I can't have access to my spare or any of my shelves. So this way, I can actually go ahead and get in from this side of the door.I have all this room and I still have everything nice and secure. The chock is going to be nice and shiny. It has a triple Chrome plated steel tubing, so it is going to resist against rust and corrosion over time even if you don't put it in an enclosed trailer, let's just say you put on a normal trailer and the elements get to it, you don't have to worry about it rusting away.

It is going to fit tire widths up to six, so for your Harley's or your street bikes, it's going to be great for that too. As far as dimensions go, we're going to have a length of 11 and 3 quarter inches. We are going to have a width of 8 and a quarter inches and a height of 8 and a half inches. But the good thing about this is when you're not using it, you can go ahead and remove it.The nice thing about it being removable is we can spend the time to put the mounts where we want it, but then we don't really have to worry about it if we're not using this trailer for hauling dirt bikes or a motorcycle or a scooter or whatever. You can just go ahead and take it out like this, throw it wherever, so if you use this enclosed trailer on the weekdays for mowing or some sort of business, you can take this out and load all your stuff up and then whenever it's time to ride, just grab this and super quick and easy to get it mounted into place.

Our mounting brackets here are going to be two inches in diameter, so they're going to be about a quarter of an inch thick and we're going to have two of them stacked on top of each other. So it's not really going to be that much sticking out.So it's not really going to affect the floor at all. You don't have to worry about running over it and something happening to the wheel you run it over with. It's just going to be nice and flush against there. Another thing is, if you're looking to mount this somewhere, the holes from center to center are spaced apart about an inch and a quarter inches apart.

So just to sum it all up, if you have a two wheeled vehicle that has a tire width of six inches or less, I would definitely recommend getting a chock. If you're just looking for a chock, I recommend getting one that is removable like this, whether it's the T-track removable type wheel chock, or one like this. I really like it just because it's super low profile, I can take it in and out in a second. So my trailer can prepared for almost anything I throw at it.The first thing I want you to do is just envision where your bike's going to be inside the trailer. I would like it to be in the center, but also I have some tie down points that I want to use, so I want it to be in the middle of that. So once you take that into consideration, what we're going to do is we're going to place it down where we want, and I'm going to actually draw a circle around this little circle here, and you'll see why in a second, so I think around here is good. To make it completely perfect, what I'm going to do is just put a dot in the very center, that's just going to help us align it up. So now what we want to do is we want to take our brackets here, we're going to have two different kinds, one's just going to have a shape like that and the other ones going to be a little channel that that little circle is going to fit through and slide around.So we're going to put the one that is bigger on the bottom. That's just going to act as our spacer. We want to make sure that both of them are facing the right direction. And then what we're going to do is we want to make sure that the skinnier part is going to be facing forward. So meaning, whenever we drive our motorcycle in, it's going to push these little studs up and into that channel, so it's not going to get loose. So make sure you do that. And then we're going to line these up with that dot right in the middle at the top of the narrowest part of that channel. So now with them in place, what we're going to do is we are going to mark the holes because we're going to do some drilling to get everything installed, so go ahead and do that. Make sure it doesn't move on you.We're going to do that same exact thing for both sides. So I'm going to be using a 7 30 seconds inch drill bit to drill these out, it's perfect size for the hardware we're using. So now what we want to do is just stack these brackets correctly, and then we're going to run our bolts through the holes. It's going to be a little tight. So now when we go down underneath our trailer, what we're going to do is we're going to put a washer, a pressure washer, and then a nut down. And we are going to need two sets of hands for this, because someone needs to take the Allen key and hold this tight while you go underneath there and tighten it up. You are going to need a deep well socket. I'm using an 11 millimeter right now.Make sure it's nice and tight. Well, now, pretty much ready to put the chock on. Now it's time to take our chock and put it into the little slots and we are ready for the bike. Well, everything's all set up. So might as well go ahead and take the bike and start loading it up. So for me, what I'm using is some Shock Straps. Basically they are the best whenever tying down any wheeled vehicle, in my opinion, and these do come with soft straps. So pretty much what I'm going to do is use the strap to wrap it around my bars and then take the hook and go through that little strap. This way, I'm not going to have to worry about scratching my bars. These are aftermarket bars, and I want to keep them pretty, that's why I bought them. So definitely pick up some of these. One thing to note, this isn't holding up my bike.So if you're doing this by yourself, what I suggest doing is just taking one of your straps, hooking it on to where it's leaning that way and it'll stay up by itself. And then go ahead and take the other strap and strap on the other side, ideally we have extra hands, but sometimes I'm riding alone, so this is the solution for that. And for the back, what I do is just bring it through my air box and hook it up somewhere, farther back than where I did put it through my bike, just like that. And we are pretty much good. Well, I hope this video helped you get an idea of if you're really in the market for a motorcycle wheel chock. But again, this one was the Erickson Removable Motorcycle Wheel Chock and I'm Adam with etrailer.


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Info for this part was:

Employee Joshua S
Video Edited:
Joshua S
Employee Cole B
Installed by:
Cole B
Employee Adam E
Installed by:
Adam E
Employee John S
Video by:
John S

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