Trailer Brake Controller Installation - 2013 Ford Edge

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How to Install the Trailer Brake Controller on a 2013 Ford Edge


Speaker 1: Today on our 2013 Ford Edge, we will be having a look at and installing the Draw-Tite Activator IV Trailer Brake Controller, part number 5504.To ease our installation, we will be using the ETBC7 Installation Kit as well, along with the Draw-Tite Replacement Brake Control Plug-in Harness. The Brake Controller's part number 20127.Now, my favorite thing about this, the sync feature is very nice. It will really let you dial in to almost make it like a proportional brake controller, but give you the benefits that a time-delay controller offers.Now, this brake controller is a nice, time delayed unit that has more features than some of the cheaper models, but yet this is still a very affordable unit to get for your vehicle. What a time delayed brake controller does over proportional brake controller is, any time your foot's on the brake pedal, the brakes are applied on your trailer even if you're not moving. This is great for if you're using your brake controller on an off-road style trailer.Now, this brake controller has three functions on it that you need to concern yourself with. Right now is your gain.

When your foot is on the brake pedal, this is your maximum amount of braking power that's gonna be there. Your gain buttons are over to the left side of it. You can go up all the way to 10 or you can back it down to zero, which would be no brake assist at all on your electric trailer brakes.So, let's go ahead and put it all the way up to 10. I'm gonna take my foot off the brake now. Put my foot back on the brake and you'll notice that it gradually steps its way up to 10.Now, you can actually control how fast the trailer brakes are being applied by using your sync feature over here to the right.

We have it go all the way up to nine . We'll let the screen shut off here. When I step on the brakes, you can see how fast it applies them. Basically it will give you instant full power on your trailer brakes when you have your sync turned all the way up.We back it down to five, you'll see it speeds up fairly quick, but not as fast. And if we go down to zero, it's a gradual step up.

So you can dial in your trailer brakes to your liking depending on your application, which is something you can't do with a lot of other time-delayed brake controllers.The final control that you have is your manual override, right here down at the bottom. It's a slider knob, and the further over you slide, the more power you get depending on how high you have your gain set. So if you only have your gain set down at five, when you slide it over, it'll only go to five.So, what this manual override will allow you to do is, if your trailer started to jackknife behind your vehicle and you wanted to bring it back in line, you could apply just the brakes on it by using the manual override without stepping on your vehicle's brake pedal, slowing it down as well. This will bring it back in track and get you more under control.Now, this brake controller will work with electric trailer brakes on trailers that have anywhere from one to four axles.Now that we've got awesome features, we'll show you how to get it installed.To begin our install, if you look at the bottom of our hitch, I've mounted a bracket so we have a place to mount our seven-way connector. This is a short, no-drill bracket.

It attaches around your hitch with a hose clamp. You can just trim off the excess when you're done.We have a longer one as well. It's part number 18136. The reason I chose a short one, when we mount this on there, it gives us adequate clearance to get our pin and clip out on our hitch. If we had a longer one, it could be blocked by it.All right, our four-pole flat trailer connector that was previously installed on our vehicle, we have a lot of excess slack in it. We don't need this connector or this much slack, so I'll just cut off the excess right here and then I will separate all four of our wires.We went ahead and stuck our separated wires through the hole in our bracket here. Now we'll attach our seven-way to the bracket using the provided hardware.Now we're tighten down our hardware.Now we'll cut off our four-pole flat connector on our seven-way so we can attach it to the wires we already cut off. Our purple wire here is for our reverse light output. In our particular application, we will not be using that. I'll just trim that off here. Now we're gonna cut off these butt connectors from our blue and our black wire because we're gonna replace them with heat shrink ones.Our white wire here has an extension with a ring terminal on it. We're not gonna utilize the ring terminal. We're gonna utilize a brown that's inside the vehicle, and we'll just tie this in to our brown wire. So we'll just cut that off there.Now we'll strip back the insulation from all of our wires and attach them with heat shrink butt connectors. They are better for being outside in the elements. They will prevent rust and corrosion and water buildup, causing a poor connection or a short. So, we'll just strip every single wire that we have.Now, these blue butt connectors, we'll use these on a smaller gauge wire. We'll use yellow ones for 10 to 12-gauge wire on the bigger wires.All right, as you can see, we just matched up green to green, yellow to yellow, brown to brown, and white to white. I stuck on some butt connectors here to our black and our blue wires as well. Gonna use our larger gauge ones.Before we use our heat gun -- which we have available on our website -- to shrink these down, we're going to attach our two wires that we need to run up to the front to here, and we'll shrink them all down at once.Okay, this is our gray duplex wire. We have two wires inside here. We need to separate them by taking a utility knife, going right down the middle, and we'll open it up. We'll find our two wires, remove that, and we'll strip back the insulation from both our wires.Okay, we'll take our black wire from our Duplex wire and we'll match that up with our black wire off of our seven-way. The white wire will combine with the blue wire. Black wires are constant 12-volt power and the white wire is from our brake controller. That's the output for your trailer brakes.And so we'll heat shrink all these down now. It's important to use a heat gun versus a lighter because it's indirect heat versus a direct flame, which can damage the heat shrink connector.All right, with all of our wires now connected and heat shrinked, I'm gonna tape our wires up together a little bit so we don't have any color wires hanging behind our vehicle.See our gray power wire, we tucked up over our heat shield on the driver's side for exhaust. Goes up above that, comes out and avoids our exhaust by plenty of room. You want to make sure you avoid sources of heat and moving parts. Went above our rear subframe, got it zip tied to this wiring harness near the end of our fuel tank. Comes alongside our fuel tank, zip tied to another wiring harness, and then there's a spot here where there's two holes in the frame. I got it zip tied through there and secured it up that. Went up and over our underbody shield here, zip tied it to a bracket for our brake and fuel lines in a couple locations, and then one here. Went above this brace for our subframe in the front, and then there's an extra hole here for an extra fuel line or brake line. It wasn't occupied, and I ran our wire right through that, and that'll hold it nice and tight up against our firewall.We dropped down a pole wire from our engine bay and taped our gray duplex wire to it so they can pull it on up. Here's our pull wire, and pull it on up, now. There's our gray wire.We went ahead and removed the battery from our vehicle because there's grommet behind it and the firewall that we're gonna need to pass some wires through.With the battery out of the way, this is the perfect opportunity for us to mount our circuit breakers. We're gonna be using two. We're gonna use a 40 amp, and this will be for our feed going to the constant 12 volt on the outlet, and our 30 amp, which will power our brake controller inside the vehicle.We're gonna mount both of these against the firewall up here in this recessed area, and we'll secure this to the firewall with some inaudible 00:08:42 screws.Now, just like we did in the back, we removed our gray sleeve that covers both of our wires. We did it all the way to the very end of them. We're gonna take our black wire now. Measure on over to the auxiliary terminal on our 40 amp breaker, that's the one closest to the engine. That's the top terminal, it's the silver one. Once you have measured off how much wire we're gonna need, we'll mark it with our fingers and cut off the excess.We'll strip off some insulation, and we'll take one of our small yellow ring terminals. Stick it on that wire inaudible 00:09:18. With the nut removed, we'll slide it on to the terminal and reinstall the nut to tighten that down later.Now we'll take the black wire that we cut off. Cut off one end of the insulation and we'll attach another small ring terminal to that, and that will go to the auxiliary port on our other breaker. This will power our brake controller.We went ahead and put our black wire that went to our 30 amp breaker through the firewall as well as our white wire that goes all the way back to our blue wire on our seven-way, and we'll just pull the slack all the way out.All right, now we will cut off our excess wire from our black and white wire to about where our OBD-2 port is. That's a good measuring point, and we'll cut off the excess. Then we'll strip out the insulation for our wires and attach the yellow butt connectors that come with our kit. I'm not using heat shrinks because we're inside the car and they're well-protected from the elements.Now we'll strip back our black wire on our additional brake control harness that we're using with this installation and the blue wire. The black wire will go to the black wire that we put through the firewall, and the blue wire will go to the white wire.Now remove this 10 millimeter nut off our negative battery post. I'll take another segment of our white wire that we have left, strip off one end, and we'll attach one of our large ring terminals to this wire, and we'll slide that over the stud on the negative battery post and reinstall the nut. Then we'll pass that white wire through the firewall just like we did the other two.All right, so this white wire, we'll cut off the excess. Trim back the insulation. After placing the butt connector on to the white wire, we'll crimp it down in to place and now we'll get the white wire off of our brake controller harness, and that leaves us with our red wire, which we need to attach to the cold side of our brake light switch. I've already determined which wire we'll be using for that before we disconnected our battery.This is our brake light switch. Now, to determine which wire it is, inaudible 00:11:53 your test light that comes with the ETBC7 kit. Poke a wire and then you can step down on the brake pedal and the wire will only have power going to it when the pedal is depressed. Either one of these purple and white wires right here will work. These are both cold side for our brake light switch.All right, so, we'll slide our quick connect on to the purple and white wire, and we'll slide our red wire in to the other end of the quick connect and we'll squeeze it shut with a pair of pliers. Now that we have it closed down over both of our wires, you see the tab is fully recessed inside the connector, so let's close our cover up on over it. This will lock it in place.Went ahead and put our battery back in position now since we have all of our wires through the firewall. Now we need to make our connections from our breaker on the battery side of it to the positive post on our battery. So, right in here or here will work just fine.We'll strip back some insulation from our black wire, put on a small yellow ring terminal, and crimp it in to place. We'll go to one of our breakers -- doesn't matter which one -- and attach that on to the stud. We'll measure off how much we need to connect to one of our studs here, cut off the excess, and we'll attach one of our large ring terminals to it and we'll repeat the process for the other breaker.Now we'll tighten down the nuts in our breakers before we connect them to the positive terminal on our battery. Now we'll take a 10 millimeter socket, remove this nut from our terminal on our battery post, and we'll slide both of our ring terminals on over that stud and reinstall the nut. Tighten it back down, close that on back up over it.All right, now we will mount our bracket which will attach our brake controller to our dash on the right side of our steering wheel just below this vent opening, here, for your inside temperature sensor. Use the self-tapping screws.Okay, that gives us a nice, solid mount. Now we'll screw our controller in to the mount using the provided screws. A right angle screwdriver is very handy for this. Okay, now we'll plug our brake controller in to the harness.Now we went ahead and bundled up all of our excess slack in our wiring up underneath the dash, making sure we avoided our pedals and the steering column.And that completes our look at and installation of the Draw-Tite Activator IV Trailer Brake Controller, part number 5504 on our 2013 Ford Edge.


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