How to Determine Best Weight Distribution System

Question:

The trailer I have know only requires a 8000# hitch at this time. I may be going to a trailer that requires a 12000# hitch later. I would like to buy just one hitch can I use the 12000# hitch on the lighter trailer? What are the draw backs? thanks

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Expert Reply:

No, if you use a weight distribution system on your trailer that is rated higher than you need, your trailer will be bouncing.

In order to choose the best weight distribution system you will first need to know your total tongue weight (TTW), which is the tongue weight of your fully loaded and ready to go trailer plus the weight of any cargo behind the rear axle of your tow vehicle.

The tongue weight is typically between 10% and 15% of your trailer's GVWR but you'll want to verify it by using a scale such as the Sherline # 5780 or by using one of the methods outlined in the help article on determining tongue weight I've linked for you. From there, simply add on the weight of the cargo behind the rear axle of your tow vehicle and you'll have your TTW. The ideal system would be one in which your TTW would fall somewhere in the middle of the weight distribution system's tongue weight capacity.

For example, if your TTW was 1,200 lbs you would want Reese Strait-Line # RP66130, which is for TTW between 800 lbs and 1,500 lbs; this would give you the best overall performance.

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Kyle S

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Question:

My trailer is a 14foot 7000# rater cargo trailer being pulled by a 2016 Ram 3500 swr with a 995 Lance camper. Just installed a torklift super hitch with a 32inch stringer. When fully loaded the trailer weights in at 5800#, this weight should never increase by more then 200#. I have pulled this trailer for 2 years and never had any problem whatsoever with sway of any kind. Knowing the weight of the boxes going into the trailer I have 60 of the weight from the front of the trailer to between the 2 rear axles as per manufacturer's recommendations and of course 40 in the back of the trailer. At this point I am not sure what tongue weight I have, I will find that out tomorrow. I am wanting to take some of the bounce out of the trailer and distribute some of the weight to the front axel of the truck and also to the trailer. The truck is also equipped with air bag, stable loads, extra rear spring and 19.5inch tires. Can you recommend a weight distribution hitch for my truck camper and trailer. If you do not think I need a hitch with sway control I would like to stay away from that mostly because of the noise the sway control hitches make?

asked by: Ken

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Expert Reply:

A weight distribution system will do exactly what you are wanting - distribute the weight to level out your ride.

Getting the right system with a truck like your '16 Ram that has a camper on it can be tricky because the camper will add quite a bit of tongue weight. If you are in the 1,800 lb to 1,900 lb range of TTW and you have a 2-1/2" hitch you can use the Blue Ox # BXW2003.

expert reply by: Kyle S
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Kyle S

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Question:

The torklift 32” hitch extension is only rated for 1200 tw with the wdh I don’t feel that it is best to exceed that weight so I will do my best with a 12000 lb to 15000 lb hitch. Can you tell me the WDH’s with a min. of 4” drop in the 12000 lb to 15000 lb range. The newer trucks sit higher then the older trucks

asked by: Ken

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Expert Reply:

A great system in that range is the Equal-i-zer Weight Distribution # EQ37141ET has a 1,000 lbs - 1,400 lbs tongue weight range and towing capacity of 14,000 lbs. It does not come with a shank so you can use the Equal-i-zer Weight Dist Shank # EQ90-02-4400 which has a maximum drop of 9".

This system comes with everything you need for installation though it is recommended you use thin-walled socket # EQ70-00-4800 to help install the hitch ball.

expert reply by: Kyle S
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Kyle S

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