30 amp 50 amp RV Service Cover

30-Amp and 50-Amp RV Service: 7 Things You Need to Know

The appeal of camping in an RV lies in its creature comforts, such as modern appliances and convenient electronics. Of course, for these items to work, you need to connect to a power source. If you're lucky, you'll be able to plug your RV cord right into a power pedestal or generator at the campground. However, as most RVers know, electrical connections aren't always so simple. Sometimes only a 30-amp outlet is available, but you have a 50-amp cord. Or maybe you want to hook up to a home outlet to store your RV for the winter.Fortunately, adapters make it easy to hook your 30-amp cord to a 50-amp outlet (or vice versa), plug into a generator, or connect to a home outlet. Learn more about choosing the right adapter for your application below. Then read on to learn more about useful electrical accessories, such as extension cords and surge protectors, that make RV life easier.
7 Things to Know About 30-Amp and 50-Amp RV Service:
  • 30-Amp and 50-Amp RV Service: What's the Difference?
  • Can I Plug My 30-Amp RV Cord into a 50-Amp Power Pedestal?
  • Can I Plug My 50-Amp RV Cord into a 30-Amp Power Pedestal?
  • Which RV-to-Generator Adapter Do I Need?
  • Can I Plug My RV into My Dryer Outlet?
  • Which RV Extension Cord Gauge and Length Do I Need?
  • 30-Amp vs. 50-Amp Surge Protectors: Which Do I Need?

30-Amp and 50-Amp RV Service: What's the Difference?

Before you can select the right adapter for your cord, it helps to have a bit of background knowledge about the electrical system you're dealing with. For RVs, you'll mainly be dealing with 30-amp or 50-amp service. Your RV will require one or the other, and fortunately, there's a simple way to check which type of plug your RV has: 30-amp plugs have three pins, and 50-amp plugs have four.30-amp service is more common in smaller RVs with fewer power-hungry appliances. For instance, you will typically find only single AC units in 30-amp service RVs. 30-amp RV plugs have a single 120-volt hot pin, a flat neutral, and a round ground pin. On the other hand, large RVs usually have 50-amp service to power their more lavish setups (think double AC units, washer/dryers, etc.). 50-amp plugs have two 120-volt hot pins, a flat neutral pin, and a round ground. A 30-amp RV can handle up to 3,600 watts; a 50-amp RV puts you up to 12,000 watts, so the increase in power is quite substantial.Once you know what type of power your RV requires, it's just a matter of making sure your plugs are the correct size to fit into a given power source. The power pedestals at campgrounds often provide both 30-amp and 50-amp outlets, although some only provide 30-amp outlets. An adapter will allow you to be prepared for whatever the campground offers.
30-Amp vs 50-Amp Service
30-Amp to 50-Amp Adapter
30-Amp to 50-Amp Adapter
50-Amp to 15-Amp Adapter
30-Amp to 15-Amp Adapter

Can I Plug My 30-Amp RV Cord into a 50-Amp Power Pedestal?

Yes! Some worry that the additional power provided by a 50-amp receptacle will fry their RV's electrical system, but this isn't so. You can plug a 30-amp RV cord into a 50-amp power receptacle, such as a power pedestal at a campground, by using an adapter. The female end of the adapter will plug into your RV cord, and the male end will plug into the power pedestal. Adapters come in two main styles: dogbone-style and plug-style, as seen below.With this type of setup, you'll enjoy the full benefits of your RV's 30 amps of power. However, note that with a 30-amp RV, the maximum power you can use is 30 amps, regardless of the receptacle you plug into—in other words, you won't be able to use 50 amps of power by plugging into a 30-amp receptacle.
30-Amp RV Cord Plug to 50-Amp Adapter
30-AMP TO 50-AMP DOGBONE ADAPTERS
ECONOMY
Mighty Cord Dogbone Adapter
Mighty Cord Dogbone RV Power Cord Adapter
# A10-5030FBK
  • Heavy-duty, weather-resistant construction
  • 12-in. long
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VALUE
Mighty Cord Dogbone Adapter w/ Handle
Mighty Cord Dogbone RV Power Cord Adapter
# A10-5030FHVP
  • Built-in handle with finger grips for convenient grip
  • Heavy-duty, weather-resistant construction
  • 12-in. long
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PREMIUM
Camco Power Grip Adapter
Camco Power Grip RV Power Cord Adapter
# CAM55175
  • Built-in handle for easy removal
  • 18-in. long
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30-AMP TO 50-AMP PLUG ADAPTER
Mighty Cord Adapter Plug
Mighty Cord RV Power Cord Adapter Plug
# A10-5030AVP
  • 50-amp male end
  • 30-amp female end
  • Grooved design for easy removal
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Can I Plug My 50-Amp RV Cord into a 30-Amp Power Pedestal?

Yes! With an adapter, you can plug a 50-amp RV cord into a 30-amp power pedestal at a campground. The female end of the adapter will plug into your RV cord, and the male end will plug into the power pedestal. However, note that without a 50-amp receptacle, you won't be operating at full power, so there will likely be some limitations on how many appliances you can run at once. For instance, if you have a large RV with two air conditioners, you will probably be limited to running one at a time, and other power-hungry appliances (such as microwaves) must be run with caution. Still, 50-amp receptacles aren't available at every campsite, so in these cases, it's best to have a 30-amp adapter with you. Adapters come in two main styles: dogbone-style and plug-style, as seen below.
50-Amp RV Cord Plug to 30-Amp Adapter
50-AMP TO 30-AMP DOGBONE ADAPTERS
ECONOMY
Mighty Cord Dogbone Adapter
Mighty Cord Dogbone RV Power Cord Adapter
# A10-3050FBK
  • Heavy-duty, weather-resistant construction
  • 12-in. long
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VALUE
Mighty Cord Dogbone Adapter w/ Handle
Mighty Cord Dogbone RV Power Cord Adapter
# A10-3050FHVP
  • Built-in handle with finger grips for convenient grip
  • Heavy-duty, weather-resistant construction
  • 12-in. long
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PREMIUM
Camco Power Grip Adapter
Camco Power Grip RV Power Cord Adapter
# CAM55185
  • Built-in handle for easy removal
  • 18-in. long
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50-AMP TO 30-AMP PLUG ADAPTER
Mighty Cord Adapter Plug
Mighty Cord RV Power Cord Adapter Plug
# A10-3050AVP
  • 30-amp male end
  • 50-amp female end
  • Grooved design for easy removal
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50-AMP TO 15/30-AMP PLUG ADAPTER
Power Grip RV Power Maximizer
Power Grip RV Power Maximizer: 50-amp female to 15-amp male and 30-amp male
# CAM55025P
  • Lets you plug RV's 50-amp power cord into 15-amp and 30-amp electrical outlets
  • Allows RV to receive 45 amps of combined power
  • 50-Amp female end connects to RV's 50-amp plug
  • 15-Amp male end plugs into 15-amp receptacle
  • 30-Amp male end plugs into 30-amp receptacle
  • Built-in handles for easy removal
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Can I Plug My RV into a 15-Amp Home Electric Outlet?

Yes! When it comes time to store your RV, it's often a good idea to hook the motorhome to a power source at home to keep the battery charged. For this, you may wish to plug into a 15-amp socket. Note that this type of connection will only provide a light charge—you won't be able to run your RV at full power the way you can at the campground. However, plugging into a home outlet will ensure your battery is charged and ready to go when RV season rolls back around. Adapters come in two main styles: dogbone-style and plug-style, as seen below.
15-Amp Male Adapter Plugs
30-AMP TO 15-AMP DOGBONE ADAPTERS
ECONOMY
Mighty Cord Dogbone Adapter
Mighty Cord Dogbone RV Power Cord Adapter
# A10-1530BK
  • Heavy-duty, weather-resistant construction
  • 90-degree female connector allow easier connection in tight spaces
  • 12-in. long
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VALUE
Mighty Cord Dogbone Adapter w/ Handle
Mighty Cord Dogbone RV Power Cord Adapter
# A10-1530HVP
  • 2 built-in handles for easy removal
  • Heavy-duty, weather-resistant construction
  • 90-degree male/female connectors allow easier connection in tight spaces
  • 12-in. long
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PREMIUM
Camco Power Grip Adapter
Camco Power Grip RV Power Cord Adapter
# CAM55165
  • Built-in handle for easy removal
  • 12-in. long
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30-AMP TO 15-AMP PLUG ADAPTERS
ECONOMY
Mighty Cord Adapter Plug
Mighty Cord RV Adapter Plug
# A10-1530AVP
  • 15-amp male end
  • 30-amp female end
  • Grooved design for easy removal
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VALUE
Power Grip Adapter Plug
Power Grip Adapter Plug
# CAM55223
  • 15-amp male end
  • 30-amp female end
  • Hourglass shape for easy removal
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PREMIUM
Power Grip Adapter Plug
Mighty Cord RV Power Cord Adapter Plug
# CAM55325
  • 15-amp male end
  • 30-amp female end
  • 90-degree design for easier connection and less strain on power cord
  • Hourglass shape for easy removal
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50-AMP TO 15-AMP DOGBONE ADAPTERS
ECONOMY
Mighty Cord Dogbone Adapter
Mighty Cord Dogbone RV Power Cord Adapter
# A10-1550VP
  • Heavy-duty, weather-resistant construction
  • 90-degree female connector allow easier connection in tight spaces
  • 12-in. long
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VALUE
Camco Power Grip Adapter
Power Grip Adapter Plug
# CAM55168
  • Built-in handle for easy removal
  • 12-in. long
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PREMIUM
Mighty Cord Dogbone Adapter w/ Handle
Mighty Cord Dogbone Adapter w/ Handle
# A10-1550D90VP
  • LED power indicator
  • Heavy-duty, weather-resistant construction
  • 90-degree female connector allows easier connection in tight spaces
  • 12-in. long
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Which RV-to-Generator Adapter Do I Need?

To plug your 30-amp or 50-amp RV cord into a generator, you will want to use an adapter made specifically for this purpose. Generator plugs come in 3-prong and 4-prong styles, so you'll need to make sure your adapter fits your generator's plug style. Note that these styles have nothing to do with whether the RV cord is 30 or 50 amps—30-amp cords can be adapted to fit both 3-prong and 4-prong generator plugs, as can 50-amp cords.When choosing a generator, you will want to make sure it offers enough power for your camper. Check out this article for help on choosing the right generator for your needs. Also consider reducing your motorhome's power requirements, such as by installing LED bulbs in place of standard bulbs.
Generator and RV-to-Generator Adapters
30-AMP GENERATOR ADAPTERS
VALUE (3 PRONG)
Mighty Cord Dogbone Adapter
Mighty Cord Dogbone Adapter
# A10-G30330VP
  • Female end connects to 30-amp RV cord
  • Male end connects to 3-prong 30-amp generator outlet
  • Twist-lock design keeps connector secure
  • Heavy-duty, weather-resistant construction
  • 12-in. long
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PREMIUM (3 PRONG)
Camco Power Grip Adapter
Camco Power Grip Adapter
# CAM55272
  • Female end connects to 30-amp RV cord
  • Male end connects to 3-prong 30-amp generator outlet
  • Twist-lock design keeps connector secure
  • Built-in handle for easy removal
  • 12-in. long
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VALUE (4 PRONG)
Mighty Cord Dogbone Adapter
Mighty Cord Dogbone Adapter
# A10-G30430VP
  • Female end connects to 30-amp RV cord
  • Male end connects to 4-prong 30-amp generator outlet
  • Twist-lock design keeps connector secure
  • Heavy-duty, weather-resistant construction
  • 12-in. long
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PREMIUM (4 PRONG)
Camco Power Grip Adapter
Camco Power Grip Adapter
# CAM55382
  • Female end connects to 30-amp RV cord
  • Male end connects to 4-prong 30-amp generator outlet
  • Twist-lock design keeps connector secure
  • Built-in handle for easy removal
  • 12-in. long
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50-AMP GENERATOR ADAPTERS
VALUE (3 PRONG)
Mighty Cord Dogbone Adapter
Mighty Cord Dogbone Adapter
# A10-G30350VP
  • Female end connects to 50-amp RV cord
  • Male end connects to 3-prong 30-amp generator outlet
  • Twist-lock design keeps connector secure
  • Heavy-duty, weather-resistant construction
  • 12-in. long
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PREMIUM (3 PRONG)
Camco Power Grip Adapter
Camco Power Grip Adapter
# CAM55412
  • Female end connects to 50-amp RV cord
  • Male end connects to 3-prong 30-amp generator outlet
  • Twist-lock design keeps connector secure
  • Built-in handle for easy removal
  • 12-in. long
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VALUE (4 PRONG)
Mighty Cord Dogbone Adapter
Mighty Cord Dogbone Adapter
# A10-G30450VP
  • Female end connects to 50-amp RV cord
  • Male end connects to 4-prong 30-amp generator outlet
  • Twist-lock design keeps connector secure
  • Heavy-duty, weather-resistant construction
  • 12-in. long
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PREMIUM (4 PRONG)
Camco Power Grip Adapter
Camco Power Grip Adapter
# CAM55422
  • Female end connects to 50-amp RV cord
  • Male end connects to 4-prong 30-amp generator outlet
  • Twist-lock design keeps connector secure
  • Built-in handle for easy removal
  • 12-in. long
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Can I Plug My RV into My Dryer Outlet?

While the outlets for 30-amp RVs look quite similar to dryer outlets, you should not attempt to connect your RV this way. RV and dryer outlets are not of the same NEMA configuration: 30-amp RV plugs are NEMA TT-30, whereas 30-amp dryer receptacles are NEMA 10-30. These configurations are not interchangeable. In fact, plugging your RV into your dryer outlet can cause major damage to your RV's electrical system.The best way to keep your RV juiced at home is to plug into an ordinary 15-amp outlet, or, for a more powerful alternative, a qualified electrician can install an electrical hookup for your RV at home. The inlets below can be installed along with the proper wiring for a home RV hookup.
30-amp RV outlet and household dryer outlet
Pictured: 30-amp RV outlet (left) and household dryer outlet (right)
30-AMP POWER INLETS
ECONOMY
Epicord 30-Amp Twist Lock Power Inlet
Epicord 30-Amp Twist Lock Power Inlet
# 277-000137
Black: # 277-000138
  • For 30-amp twist-lock RV power cord
  • Dust cover protects inlet from water and debris
  • UV-stabilized glass-filled polyester
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VALUE
Mighty Cord 30-Amp Twist Lock Power Inlet
Mighty Cord 30-Amp Twist Lock Power Inlet
# A10-30INVP
Black: # A10-30INBKVP
  • For 30-amp twist-lock RV power cord
  • Secure, watertight dust cover protects inlet when not in use
  • Durable polyester construction
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PREMIUM
Furrion 30-Amp Twist Lock Power Inlet
Furrion 30-Amp Twist Lock Power Inlet
# 431861
  • For 30-amp twist-lock RV power cord
  • Dust cover protects inlet from water and debris
  • LED power indicator
  • Fiber-filled casing for harsh marine environments
  • Colors available: White
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50-AMP POWER INLETS
ECONOMY
Epicord 50-Amp Twist Lock Power Inlet
Epicord 50-Amp Twist Lock Power Inlet
# 277-000139
Black: # 277-000140
  • For 50-amp twist-lock RV power cord
  • Dust cover protects inlet from water and debris
  • UV-stabilized glass-filled polyester
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VALUE
Mighty Cord 50-Amp Twist Lock Power Inlet
Mighty Cord 50-Amp Twist Lock Power Inlet
# A10-50INVP
Black: # A10-50INBKVP
  • For 50-amp twist-lock RV power cord
  • Secure, watertight dust cover protects inlet when not in use
  • Durable polyester construction
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PREMIUM
Furrion 50-Amp Twist Lock Power Inlet
Furrion 50-Amp Twist Lock Power Inlet
# 381660
  • For 50-amp twist-lock RV power cord
  • Dust cover protects inlet from water and debris
  • LED power indicator
  • Fiber-filled casing for harsh marine environments
  • Colors available: White
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What Wire Gauge Can My RV Use? Should I Use a Household Extension Cord?

Power cord extensions are there for you when the electric box is just out of reach. It's important to use a wire gauge designed to handle your RV's current—keep in mind that most ordinary household cords will not be sufficient for use with an RV. Using a household extension cord with an improperly small wire gauge can damage the cord and/or your RV's electrical system.Instead, there are a variety of extension cords available that are designed for RV use. 30-amp RV extension cords typically feature 10-gauge wire, and 50-amp cords usually feature 6-gauge hot and neutral wires with an 8-gauge ground.Most RV extension cords range from 10 to 50 feet long. Keep in mind, however, that the longer the extension cord, the more voltage drop you'll experience. If the drop is too severe, large appliances like AC units and refrigerators may not be able to draw their required voltage and may not function properly. For this reason, it's best to go with the shortest possible extension that will suit your needs.
RV Power Cord
30-AMP POWER INLETS
ECONOMY
Mighty Cord RV Extension Cord
Mighty Cord RV Extension Cord
# A10-3025EH
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VALUE
Mighty Cord RV Extension Cord
Mighty Cord RV Extension Cord
# A10-3025EHLED
  • Lengths available: 25 ft., 50 ft.
  • 30-amp male plug
  • 30-amp female plug
  • LED indicators illuminate when connected to power
  • Built-in, foldaway handles for easy removal
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PREMIUM
Power Grip RV Extension Cord
Power Grip RV Extension Cord
# CAM55197
  • 50 ft. long
  • 30-amp male plug
  • 30-amp female plug
  • Built-in handles for easy removal
  • Strap buckles around cord for easy transport and storage
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50-AMP POWER INLETS
ECONOMY
Mighty Cord RV Extension Cord
Mighty Cord RV Extension Cord
# A10-5025EH
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VALUE
Mighty Cord RV Extension Cord
Mighty Cord RV Extension Cord
# A10-5025EHLED
  • Lengths available: 25 ft., 50 ft.
  • 50-amp male plug
  • 50-amp female plug
  • LED indicators illuminate when connected to power
  • Built-in, foldaway handles for easy removal
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PREMIUM
Power Grip RV Extension Cord w. Strap
Power Grip RV Extension Cord
# CAM55195
  • 30 ft. long
  • 50-amp male plug
  • 50-amp female plug
  • Built-in handles for easy removal
  • Strap buckles around cord for easy transport and storage
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30-Amp vs. 50-Amp Surge Protectors: Which Do I Need?

The last thing you want to do is damage your RV's electrical system at the campsite. Fortunately, electrical protection devices such as surge protectors and voltage analyzers/monitors can offer you peace of mind. Both will help protect your RV from improperly wired electrical boxes and power surges.A surge protector does just what its name suggests—it triggers when it detects a power surge and prevents the current from wreaking havoc on your RV. Voltage analyzers and voltage monitors take the protection a step further by detecting faults with the electrical box and indicating any issues. Voltage analyzers disconnect when they detect surges and must be manually reset. Voltage monitors protect against surges as well as low voltage; they disconnect and reconnect automatically.

Can I use a 50-amp surge protector to plug my 30-amp RV into a 30-amp outlet?

Short answer—you shouldn't. A 50-amp surge protector won't trigger soon enough to protect a 30-amp RV, so you risk damaging your system. On the other hand, a 30-amp surge protector will trigger too soon when plugged into a 50-amp receptacle, thus limiting the power flowing to your 50-amp RV.

Can I use a 50-amp surge protector with a 30-to-50 adapter (30-amp RV)?

In this case, too, you should stick with an adapter made for your RV service, not the power source, for the reasons mentioned above. In short, 30-amp RVs need 30-amp surge protectors, and 50-amp RVs need 50-amp surge protectors.
Voltage Analyzers Vs Voltage Monitors Infographic
50-AMP RV SURGE PROTECTORS/VOLTAGE ANALYZERS
VALUE
Camco RV Power Defender/Circuit Analyzer
Camco RV Power Defender Circuit Analyzer
# CAM55313
  • Plugs into 50-amp receptacle at RV park
  • Protection up to 4,200 Joules
  • Helps protect RV from improperly wired electrical boxes & power surges
  • Diagnostic lights indicate faults
  • One-time surge protector (manual reset)
  • Weather-resistant unit protects electrical components
  • Handles for easy removal
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VALUE
Camco RV Power Defender Voltage Monitor
Camco RV Power Defender Voltage Monitor
# CAM55306
  • Plugs into 50-amp receptacle at RV park
  • Protection up to 3,850 Joules
  • Helps protect RV from improperly wired electrical boxes & power surges
  • Diagnostic lights indicate faults
  • Automatically disconnects when dangerous voltage levels detected
  • Automatically reconnects when voltage levels stabilize
  • Water-resistant unit protects electrical components
  • Built-in handles for easy removal
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Written by: Amber S.Updated on: 5/28/2020

Questions and Comments about this Article

Marcos S.

I have a 50 amp RV and connected into a 15 amp/110 outlet over the winter to maintain my batteries. My refrigerator is a residential unit with no way to turn it off unless I disconnect it. Will the batteries still charge with the refrigerator running? 105231

Reply from Jon G.

I would think so but that kind of depends on the size of the fridge and if you have any kind of charger/maintainer for the batteries that can help read things like that. 76173

Will

I have a 50 amp Rv. Can I use a dual 30 amp to 50 amp “Y” adaptor to two 30 amp on a 9000 w generator? 104103

Reply from Jon G.

Yes, just keep in mind that you will still be limited by 50A since that's what your RV is rated for. 76118

Walt S.

If you have an RV with 50 Amps service .With two legs of 120 Volts each .When you’re plugged in to a 15 amp cord how is everything in the RV still work? 104011

Reply from Jon G.

What do you mean by everything? Were you still able to run your AC and appliances with a larger draw like that? The only thing I can think of is if for some reason those were pulling power from your battery bank instead of directly from that power cord. As we state in the article, using just the 15 Amp service should only be providing a maintenance charge to your battery bank. 76070

Reply from Walt S.

@JonG I don’t mean that you can run everything at once .I mean all the 110 plugs are hot ,how is that possible when you’re bringing two legs in when your hooked to 50 amps? And only one leg when your hooked to 15 amps. And still all plugs are hot. 76076

Reply from Jon G.

@WaltS Ah, that makes much more sense. When plugged into 15A service that means that the max you can draw is 15A without blowing any fuses/breakers. Since all you're doing is completing a circuit when you test that means that you aren't exceeding that 15A draw. 76077

Metro

This is a good article that has a lot of very good good information but it leaves me confused about the power source. A typical house has 3 lines from the power pole that has 2 power lines and a return. Between either power line and return measures 120V. Between the two power lines measures 240V (2 phase). Does a 50 amp service from the power pedestal provide power similar to house power? That is, measuring between the 2 power lines yields 240V? 103442

Reply from Jon G.

Essentially, yes. It's just important to remember that there is a 50A limiter via the RV breaker so you'll need to remain under 50A total - not just per line. 75862

Keith G.

I thought 30 amp coaches were 30 amp everywhere and 50 amp were 25 one side 25 the other 103348

Reply from Jon G.

The 30-Amp Service has 1 power pin while the 50-Amp Service has 2 power pins. The 30A version pin is rated for 30A alone while the 50A plug is rated for 50A together, so basically you have to remain under 50A otherwise the breaker will blow. From my understanding there isn't a denoted amount of amps to either pin. 75805

Reply from Steven

@JonG if the 50 amp feed needs to stay under 50 amps total, that would provide a maximum of 6000 watts. The article says 12,000 watts for 50 amp, which would suggest 50 amps per leg. 75834

Reply from Jon G.

@Steven The 50A service on the RV side is 50A per leg. The limiting factors are the pedestal that you connect to as well as the breaker for the 50A service on your RV. So even though the power is available you still need to be mindful of what you're using so you don't blow any fuses, very much like what happens at your home. 75839

Chris B.

We just bought an RV trailer that uses 30 amp service. We want to install an RV receptacle at home. Since we may decide to upgrade to a larger 50 amp trailer at some point, does it make sense for us to install a 50 amp receptacle at home and use a converter? Is that any less safe? 103257

Reply from Jon G.

As stated in the article it is completely safe to plug in your 30A trailer into a 50A service using an adapter (see linked selection). This way when you do go to a larger trailer you don't have to worry about reconfiguring your receptacle at home. 75753

Jim G.

Question. We just purchased a new trailer that has 50 amp service. The 50 amp cord is tough to handle. Not all places we go has 50 amp service. Instead of using an adapter (50 to30). Will a 30 amp cord pug into the trailer in place of the 50 amp cord? 102594

Reply from Jon G.

You can, but if that's all that you carry with you then that means you'll be limited to 30A even if you're plugged into a 50A service. I'd just carry the adapter with you so that you know you're getting the most out of whatever service you're connected to. 75499

John C.

I have a 30amp trailer. Bought a generator that has a 30amp, 4-prong 240v receptacle. Can I take my cord from the trailer, get an adapter to hook directly to the 4-prong receptacle and power my rig that way? I think that is what this article was about but I want to make sure. I've read from other locations that even with that, I should only use the 15 amp receptacle. Why the 30 amp receptacle on generators then? 102434

Reply from Jon G.

You should be just fine using an adapter like part # CAM55382 . I think what they are referring to is the 240V setting on your generator, but your generator should also be rated for 120V as well so it'll be just fine. Did they give any reasons as to why you should only use the 15A? 75406

Reply from John C.

@JonG other than because it was 240v not a 30 amp 120v receptacle. That was the conversation when the answer came back as such. I didn’t quite understand that. Thanks 75413

Reply from Jon G.

@JohnC What generator do you have? I've been doing some more research and it looks like if your outlet is only rated for 240V then that isn't good for your trailer. Are there any type of switches or other outlets on it? 75419

Reply from John C.

@JonG it is the Predator 4350 model. It has that 240v and then four 120v outlets. Perhaps I can’t use it for that then. I can run extension cords for specific things then or hooking up battery charger I guess. Sounds like I’m limited with options with this model 75429

Reply from Jon G.

@JohnC I wasn't able to find that exact model but I was able to see the 4375 model which I'm guessing is similar? For the 4375 it has an AC 120/240V outlet that is rated for 15A which makes sense as to why they would recommend a 15A cord. With that being said, since your trailer will be rated for 30A I wouldn't use this generator to power your trailer. Otherwise you're probably going to be constantly tripping up those breakers. 75432

Reply from John C.

@JonG Sorry, I did mean model 4375. You got it. Thanks. 75441

Reply from Jon G.

@JohnC Anytime! 75459

Phil B.

Info above very helpfull. My son inlaw purchased a generator that has a 50 amp 240 volt outlet. His house has a 30 amp 240 volt service line with 4 prongs. Is it safe to pug into this line? The house already has a set up breaker box for power failure. 102235

Reply from Jon G.

I would think that's okay but you really need to speak with a technician that specializes in residential generator setups like what you have. There can be differences between residential and RV so I recommend going that route to ensure it's okay. 75316

Dlo

I used a MightyCord 14-50P to TT30-R adapter to plug my RV into a 220V 14-50 outlet at my house (used for an EV car charger), and only remembered it was 220V a few seconds later. There doesn't appear to be any damage to the RV, which really surprised me. Is it possible this is due to the adapter not using all the wires from the 14-50, and thus not transferring 220V to the RV? I'm relieved there was no damage, but is it safe to use in this way? 102036

Reply from Jon G.

It could be but I'm not sure to be quite honest. When it comes to connecting an RV to an outlet at your house we always recommend consulting a professional electrician to make sure that everything is safe to use together. 75217

Tim R.

Why is there no 6-50p to TT-30r adapter available? This would go from my welder outlet in the garage so I can plug my 30a trailer in. 100362

Reply from Jon G.

I just don't think that there is very much of a demand for that type of an adapter which is why you're having a hard time finding it. 73862

Reply from Tim R.

@JonG - OK, I was thinking there might be a compatibility issue of some sort, I'm no electrician. I have one coming tomorrow to do some work here, I'll ask if that is the issue. 73863

Reply from Jon G.

@TimR Yeah the best thing to do in that instance is to have a professional come out and make sure that everything is safe. 74865

Glen R.

I have been looking on your site to find a 30amp receptical and plug that are compatible for my travel trailer, and two that might be comparable the numbers are A 10-30FDT and A 10-30INBKUP. I am contacting you to verify these numbers that could be a match that would connect together. Could you help me for conformation on these items. Thank for the help. 98157

Reply from Jon G.

I'm guessing you mean the parts # A10-30FDT and # A10-30INVP ? I wasn't able to find a part with the number A10-30INBKUP that you mentioned but I can confirm that the 2 part numbers I mentioned above are compatible with each other. 73019

Charles W.

I have a 50 Amp receptacle on the outside of my house where I plug in my generator when I lose electricity in storms. My RV is also 50 Amp, so I am wondering if I can plug into that receptacle to power my RV? Will power run in the right direction? 97900

Reply from Jon G.

You should be okay to do this (I confirmed this with my contact at Mighty Cords) but I'd double check with the company that set up your generator receptacle just to be on the safe side of things. 73023

Sarah P.

We have a teardrop trailer that runs on 30amp. Other than connecting to charge at home we've not yet camped at sites with power. This is all new and a bit confusing so bear with me. We have a 30/15a dogbone adapter. We will be staying a a site soon that has 20A. What do we need to connect? 97037

Reply from Jon G.

You'll need one of the adapters in the link here. Each one has a different male connection to the 20A so you'll need to reach out to the campsite to see what type of connection they have. 72601

Greg M.

I am storing my 50 amp fifth wheel where there is a house plug 15 amp service. I have purchased your 50 amp to 15 amp adapter to connect at the RV. From the adapter I am running my extension cord to the House outlet. Can I use a 15 amp surge protector? And what size lead cord should I be using? 94394

Reply from Chris R.

You could use a 15 amp surge protector but it wouldn't really protect your 5th wheel, since it runs on 50 amp service. You technically would still want to stick with a 50 amp surge protector for this application. 69877

Donald P.

I have a 2018 30-amp travel trailer, 33' long, one 15K A/C unit. I often camp at parks where both 30 and 50 amp hookups are available at my site. Would it be more beneficial to always hook up to the 50 amp service when available to take full advantage of all 30 amps of power I may need? I've stayed at some parks where the 30 amp breakers were weak and would trip before full load. Please let me know. Thanks. 91987

Reply from Chris R.

I don't honestly think it would matter, either way. Assuming you're using an adapter like # A10-5030FBK you'd still be getting 30 amps when hooking up to a 50 amp outlet. If you run into issues with not getting enough power from 30 amp outlets though it's certainly a fine solution. 69644

Reply from Donald P.

@ChrisR Thank you for your reply. Yes I have this 30 to 50 amp adapter. I know my rig pulls right at 28 amps at full load and sometimes I trip the 30 amp breaker, especially at state parks. If I just hooked to the 50 amp to begin with then I wouldn't have to worry about it. 69647

Dan M.

Is there or can it be made, a 50 Amp plug that is divided into a 30 amp & 20 amp receptacle? That way I could use the 30 Amps to power my RV and the 20 Amp to power my added AC unit going thru a 50 Amp Power Defender/Circuit Analyzer. Also where could I get it? 86618

Reply from Chris R.

The closest adapter we have to that is the Camco # CAM55025 , which lets you go from the 50 amp plug on your camper/RV to 15 amp and 30 amp outlets. I'm not away of something similar that goes to 30 amp and 20 amp outlets. 68334

Reply from Dan M.

I'm actually looking for an adapter that goes from 50 Amp shore power to a 30 amp receptacle and a 15 amp receptacle and is there a way one can be constructed if there isn't one available? 68338

Reply from John B.

@DanM I have a 30amp RV. Many campsites do not have an additional 15 amp outlet. I purchased a a big, yellow adapter that is a 50 amp male with two 30 amp females. Put the male 50 amp plug into a 50amp pedestal, then plug 30amp Rv male into one 30 amp female and use a 30amp male-to-15amp female adapter in the other for regular extension cord. I am traveling now but do not have the big adapter with me. I will be home after Sept.8th...email me then and I can give you the brand name. 71423

Reply from John B.

@DanM Here is the info you needed: I have a MARINCO LL95531 adapter. Main plug is 50 amp male that splits to two 30 amps females, 125/250 V, na-1-2. It is bright yellow, however I have painted mine black to be less noticeable at the RV park pedestal. 73365

Bruce B.

Thank you. Very helpful. 86415

Reply from John B.

@BruceB My adapter is a MARINCO LL95531; 125/250 V, NA-1-2. Male 50 amp splits into two 30 amp females. 73366

Greg L.

I have a 30 RV and I use a 30 Amp surge protector. I will be camping at a park with 50 Amp service. I have a 50 to 30 amp dog bone for the connection. Is the proper way to hook up to connect the 50 to 30 dog bone to the pedestal then plug in my 30 amp surge protector and then my 30 amp cord to camper? 81416

Reply from Chris R.

You are exactly right! 66978

Roy

So, I have an RV with a 30 amp system. I purchased a 50 amp Portable RV EMS with Surge Protection EMS-PT50X by mistake. Question: With a 30 amp supply at a campground, can I plug the 50 amp surge protection into the 30 amp supply and then attach a 50 amp - 30 amp dogbane and not worry? 80992

Reply from Chris R.

Physically that would work but the 50 amp surge protector won't do much good since it wouldn't protect against surges over 30 amps. 66594

Rudy R.

one other thought to my previous post about 50A vs. 30A : they should be more accurately described as 50 amp - 240 volt to 30 amp - 110 volt adapter, because you just cant assume anything anymore! take note manufacturers. 77387

Rudy R.

The 50 amp side of the adapter has 2 pins for power (black), 1 pin for common (white), and 1 pin for ground (green); the 30 amp side of the adapter needs only one black pin to be connected to one of the 30A pins to give you 110 volts. If you want to check your adapter to make sure your 240V - 50A power supply is being converted to 110V-30A, you can test one side pin or the other with a volt meter to see if its "dead". I havnt been able to find an explanation of this until I recently bought a clear plastic 50A to 30A plug style adapter that you can see the wiring inside, and one of the 50A pins is not connected, so voila! 110volts and my RV is not fried! 77385

Pc

I’m new to home generators. I bought a Champion 3400 for power before the next Harvey or Ike hits. I want to know the type of safe extension cord I need to run from the generator into the house for the frig and portable a/c. Thanks 77097

Reply from Chris R.

You'll need to use a heavy duty 240 watt extension cord from the generator to an outlet that would be installed on the outside of your house. To set your house up so that you can power things like your fridge and AC with the generator (when needed), you'll want to have an electrician come by to add a generator interlock kit to your breaker box, along with the plug outlet on the house. 62818

Natalie R.

I think 15-amp powered RVs are typically small, so they do not need a lot of power. They use the same power capacity as the ones that you find at home. What do you think about that. Thanks for your useful information in the article! 75888

Reply from Chris R.

I agree. A trailer/RV designed for 15 amp service wouldn't have too many powered accessories and would definitely be on the smaller side. 62009



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