Best SUV Weight Distributions

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Weight Distribution Questions

  • The best way to determine the maximum weight of the trailer you can safely tow is to subtract the weight of the fully loaded vehicle (curb weight plus weight of all cargo, driver and passengers) from the 12,500 GCVW. The figure you end up with will represent the maximum trailer weight you can safely tow. You would also need to check the capacity of your hitch, which might be different from the capacity of the truck itself. The trailer you tow cannot weigh any more that the capacity...
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  • We will plan for the maximum gross trailer weight of 8,200 pounds. The dry tongue weight, 910, is right around 15 percent of the 6,300 dry weight. We can then estimate at 8,200 pounds trailer weight our tongue weight is 1,230 pounds. Since your tongue weight will be somewhere between 910 and 1,230 pounds, Reese Strait-Line Weight Distribution system, part # RP66074, would work perfect for you. It has the Dual-Cam Sway Control System which is the best system for a larger trailer,...
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  • Sway controls are designed to be used in situations where sway is a direct result of some type of road condition, like high winds or large vehicles passing. If you have sway with a trailer under normal towing conditions, sway control will most likely not correct the problem. The best defense against trailer sway in all conditions is proper trailer loading. You will need to check your trailer tongue weight and gross trailer weight and get the weight distributed properly. Most...
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  • The Eaz-Lift weight distribution systems use independent friction-style sway control, also known as bar-style sway control like the Pro Series Friction Sway Control Bar, # 83660. Since your trailers GTW is over 6,000 lbs, we recommend using two sway control units. One on the driver side and one on the passenger side. Two sway control units are also recommended for trailers that are 26 ft or longer. To install these units, you will bolt the ball plate to the side of the trailer...
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  • Sway control is designed to be used in situations where the trailer sways under adverse conditions such as high winds or when large vehicles are passing causing the trailer to become unstable. Sway control also helps if you have to maneuver suddenly. Also if the trailer has a low tongue weight percentage the sway control can help to a point, but a weight distribution system will help more with this situation. The best solution for sway that is present without the above mentioned...
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  • An equalizing hitch or weight distribution can sometimes increase the capacity of the receiver hitch, but the vehicle manufacturers stated towing capacity or rating will always be the final determination of how much the vehicle can tow. Any towing system will only be as strong as its lowest rated component. I would urge you to abide by the stated towing capacity of your truck. Failure to do so can cause the hitch to fail or damage drive train components on the vehicle.
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  • As with any towing system you are limited to lowest rated component of the system. Sometimes that is the vehicle towing capacity. If you are looking for an SUV vehicle to tow a mid to large size camper, then you will want to make sure that the vehicle is rated for towing not only the dry weight but also the weight of any cargo, fluid, gear, etc. that you will have in the camper. You will need to check the gross trailer weight (GTW) that is the weight of the trailer fully loaded,...
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  • You will need to check your vehicle owners manual, the drivers side door jamb, and the trailer hitch itself, to determine the maximum towing capacity for your specific vehicle. I did some research on the internet and found that the 2008 Toyota Highlander, is rated for from 2,000 lbs towing up to 5,000 lbs towing if properly equipped for max towing. Actually checking your specific vehicle is the only safe way to determine the maximum capacity. You should be able to select...
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  • I spoke to my contact at Reese and he informed me that most likely you have a Reese Friction Sway Control, part # 83660, because this product has not changed at all. I attached installation instructions for this product for you to check out. The handle is actually the on/off switch for the unit. To set the level of friction you will actually use the bolt that is below the on/off handle as it is the gain level. To get maximum benefits from the sway control assembly, a series...
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  • Yes, the Strait-Line Weight Distribution Hitch System can be adapted to a V-Nose style trailer. You would need to use an alternate mounting system for the chain hanger brackets. The Bolt on Chain Hanger Kit, item # RP58305, will bolt onto the side of trailer frame. Once installed the chains are attached by raising the trailer tongue and rear of vehicle with the trailer jack. Tubular frames cannot be wider than 2-1/4 inches with this hanger kit, so you will need to be sure and...
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  • You will need to check with the vehicle manufacturer or your specific vehicles owners manual to get the GCVWR (Gross Combined Vehicle Weight Rating) for your 2003 Ford Explorer V6. Once this is located you will need to subtract the gross weight of your vehicle fully loaded from the GCVWR and that will give you the total amount of weight the manufacturer allows for towing. You will also need to determine the weight ratings of the hitch on your Explorer, and whether it is designed...
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  • The handle is actually the on/off switch for the unit and the bolt under the handle is the tension adjustment bolt. You will need to turn the On/Off handle clockwise (tighter) until the handle will stay firmly in place parallel with the main body of the sway control. Start out setting the sway control by testing with the adjustment bolt at the factory preset level of friction. You will need to perform a series of road tests with the loaded trailer. If there is not enough sway...
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  • The key to choosing the correct weight distribution system is knowing the tongue weight of your trailer when it is fully loaded and ready to tow. You should also keep in mind that anything loaded behind the rear axle of your 2013 Ford Explorer will contribute to the tongue weight as well. I would recommend choosing a system that has a tongue weight range that encompasses the tongue weight of your trailer with its heaviest load. The tongue weight of a trailer is typically calculated...
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  • Your salesman is correct in that a weight distribution system will, in most cases, allow a vehicle to tow additional weight, but the amount of additional weight is not a static number and is vehicle specific. You should check your owners manual, or the vehicle dealer, for hitch specifications for the Max Gross trailer weight allowable when using a weight distributing hitch. I checked the online owners manual for a 2007 Chevrolet Colorado. If this is the the vehicle you will...
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  • The difference between the two systems is basically the attachment point. One is not better than the other except that the trunnion bars are a little easier to install than the round bars that require a clip to hold them into the head. For the round bars it is easier to adjust the angle of the ball mount to get the system in the correct position for towing and weight distribution. The Strait-Line Weight Distribution Hitch, item # RP66074, is an excellent system that controls...
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  • Weight distribution works to distribute the tongue weight of a trailer up to the front axle of the tow vehicle so that it will sit more level and handle/brake better. That being said the systems do not "reduce" tongue weight or allow you to tow beyond the capacities of the vehicle. Typically though there is a second higher capacity for the hitch for when weight distribution is used. You would need to check for that figure and be sure that the loaded tongue weight does not exceed...
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  • The Reese Weight Distribution System, # RP66022, has several points of adjustability depending on your application. The head unit can be tilted toward or away from the trailer which will raise or lower the spring bars. The head can also be adjust vertically and the spring bar chains can be adjusted. What you are looking for is a level trailer with the spring bars parallel with the trailer frame or pointed down slightly. Ideally, you will want 5 chain links between the spring bars...
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  • A weight distribution system will not change the tongue weight of the trailer. It just maximizes the vehicle and hitches capacities if rated for weight distribution (check the sticker on the hitch and the owners manual for your 2013 Ford F-150). The 10 to 15 percent of gross trailer weight when calculating tongue weight is more of a guide to figuring things out. It is not a hard and fast rule. You will know if the tongue weight is too little or too heavy. Too little tongue...
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  • When choosing a weight distribution system, it is best to begin the process knowing the fully loaded and ready to tow tongue weight. The procedure for determining this is shown in the FAQ article I have linked you to. Since you are not able to confirm your tongue weight, please understand that anything I recommend will merely be an educated guess. I would recommend going with a 1,200 lb max capacity system to provide some cushion, since actual ready-to-roll tongue weight is...
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  • The best weight distribution systems with sway control that we offer are the Reese Strait-Line systems, such as the # RP66084 that you referenced. The Strait-Line weight distribution systems use the dual cam type of sway control which is a proactive style of sway control that keeps the trailer inline with the tow vehicle at all times to prevent sway from starting in the first place, rather than trying to correct it once it starts. The other types of weight distributions such...
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