Best Dodge Grand Caravan Minivan Weight Distributions

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Dodge Grand Caravan Weight Distribution Questions

  • The weight of anything stowed behind the rear axle would need to be deducted from the vehicle's tongue weight capacity, but the weight of the hitch and the weight distribution system used would not. You wouldn't really consider the weight of the system as trailer tongue weight either, because when you choose the system, you'll leave enough wiggle room between your trailer's actual fully loaded and ready to tow tongue weight and its maximum capacity to account for the weight...
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  • For a tongue weight of roughly 500 lbs I recommend the Reese Straight-Line part # RP66082 in that dual cam system allows for a much more effective method of sway prevention in comparison to the Blue Ox SwayPro. In order to check the exact tongue weight of your trailer and loaded vehicle, you will need to calculate the loaded tongue weight of your trailer and any cargo loaded behind the rear axle of your tow vehicle. The best way to do this is with our Tongue Weight Scale part...
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  • As long as you have a trailer hitch like the Draw Tite part # 75579 installed on your 2016 Dodge Grand Caravan that is rated for use with weight distribution systems the Reese Steadi-Flex part # 66557 would be a great option for your tongue weight of 200 lbs. For hitch balls you would want the part # 63845 for a 2 inch ball or part # 63847 for a 2-5/16 inch ball.
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  • The first thing you will want to do is consult the vehicle owners manual and the trailer hitch safety sticker to determine if both are rated for use with weight distribution and for the required towing capacities. I looked up information on the trailer and there are numerous 17 foot Casita Deluxe models across the years. It looks like the dry weight at most is 2,500 pounds. To choose a weight distribution system you will need to go by the total tongue weight. This is calculated...
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  • First, you will want to determine if the hitch you have on your vehicle is rated for use with a weight distribution system. This information will be located on an ID label on the hitch itself. There will be a gross trailer weight and tongue weight listed for both with and without a weight distribution system. If your hitch does not list a rating for weight distribution, then one cannot be installed on your Dodge Caravan. If you can use weight distribution, then you want to...
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  • The replacement L-pins for the 4,000 pound Equal-I-zer Weight Distribution System # EQ37040ET are part # 90-03-9460. The clips for the pins are part # 90-04-9208.
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  • The maximum rise for the Pro Series Weight Distribution Kit # 49586 is 6-1/2 inches. This hitch has a tongue weight capacity between 500 and 800 lbs. In order to choose the best weight distribution hitch, you will first need to know your total tongue weight. That weight is going to be the tongue weight of your fully loaded and ready to go trailer plus the weight of any cargo behind the rear axle of your 2014 Dodge Grand Caravan. To determine total tongue weight you can use...
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  • If you are adding the weight towards the back of the trailer then the tongue weight probably won't go too much above the 480 pounds that it is now. When determining tongue weight you also have to factor in the weight of anything loaded behind the rear axle of your 2013 Dodge Grand Caravan. If all of that keeps the tongue weight below the capacity of Curt weight distribution system # C17051 then it will work well. You would just need to add a ball; # 40038 for a 2 inch or # C40030...
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  • Sounds like your vehicle has a towing capacity of 2,000 lbs when not using a weight distribution system and 3,800 lbs when using one. The best way to pick out a weight distribution system is to base it off of the loaded tongue weight of the setup when it is loaded and ready to tow. This figure also includes the weight of any cargo behind the rear axle of the tow vehicle. I attached a help article on determining tongue weight for you to check out as well. You will want the...
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  • Trunnion Bar systems will have greater ground clearance under the coupler than round bar systems like the part # PS49901 that you are interested in. However, the lowest point of the system would be the point where the chains connect to the ends of the spring bars. This would be about the same height on both types of systems. That point will also vary depending on how much spring tension is required. A much better solution would be the Trunnion System part # RP66151 as at the...
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  • You can install the Curt Friction sway control part # 17200 on the left side of the trailer. All you need to do is loosen the handle of the # 17200, remove the inner piece, rotate it 180 degrees and then reinsert and it would be setup to be used on the the left side of the trailer. Typically the best way to combat sway is proper trailer loading. If you can move as much of the weight in pop up to the front of the trailer you would be better off.
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  • Selection of a properly-matched weight distribution and sway control system for your Dodge Caravan and Forest River R-Pod trailer depends on your trailers actual fully-loaded tongue weight. You also need to verify that your hitch receiver is rated for use with a weight distribution system; this will be indicated on its safety/warning sticker. It is important to measure your trailer tongue weight in its road-ready state, with full water and propane tanks and all supplies and...
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  • The trunnion style bars, like on # RP66151, are considered more heavy duty, they are easier to install than round bars, and they offer more ground clearance than a round bar system. If you have a taller vehicle like a full size truck, ground clearance will not be an issue. Once you have installed and removed the round spring bars a few times, installation will be easy enough, though not as simple as with the trunnion style bars. And as long as you are within the capacity of...
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  • First, you want to choose a weight distribution system based on the tongue weight of the trailer when loaded and ready to tow but also, you must factor in the weight of anything loaded behind the rear axle of the van when you calculate tongue weight. For example if the trailer tongue weight is 350 pounds and you have 150 pounds of luggage in the cargo area, that brings the tongue weight to 500 pounds. For your trailer I would look at a weight distribution system rated for 200...
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  • To choose a weight distribution system you will need to go by the total tongue weight. This is calculated by taking the tongue weight of the trailer when it is loaded and ready to tow and then adding the weight of anything loaded behind the rear axle of the tow vehicle. Tongue weight is typically 10 to 15 percent of the gross trailer weight. For a 3,100 pound trailer that would be 310 to 465 pounds. Based on these numbers I reocmmend a system rated 200 to 600 pounds tongue...
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  • The most important figure to consider when picking out a weight distribution system is the loaded tongue weight of your setup, this also includes the weight of any cargo behind the rear axle of the tow vehicle. I attached an FAQ article on determining tongue weight for you to check out. Your calculations sound like they would be pretty accurate, so with that in mind the Reese Weight Distribution w/out Shank # RP66020 would be an excellent choice for a weight distribution system...
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  • Your trailer won't have enough tongue weight to get the spring bars of the Curt # C17062 Weight distribution system to flex, it'll make for a rough ride and the system won't distribute enough (if any) tongue weight to the front vehicle axle to level your ride height. I'd recommend a lower rated system like the Pro Series # PS49902 which is rated for tongue weights ranging from 550 to 750 lbs. Ideally, you want the fully loaded and ready to tow tongue weight of your trailer...
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  • I have wondered the same thing as you, and in fact last time Reese was here I asked them the same question and their response was that the weight of the weight distribution system does not count as tongue weight when you are trying to determine the proper rated system for a vehicle/trailer. If the hitch you referenced is a factory option for your vehicle then that would be already factored into the tongue weight of the vehicle, if it is an aftermarket hitch option then you...
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  • This is an interesting situation because on the one hand, the vehicle manufactures says to use weight distribution and on the other, the trailer manufacturer says not to. In this case, I think it is better to go with the vehicle manufacturer and use a weight distribution system. So after the trailer is fully loaded and ready to tow, it can be between 1,500 pounds and 2,000 pounds, if not more. Tongue weight is typically 10 to 15 percent of the gross trailer weight. This puts...
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