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Ford F-150 weight distribution Videos

Pro Series Weight Distribution System Installation - 2004 Ford F-150

Today on this 2004 Ford F150 Super Cab, we're going to install Part number PS49902. This is a Pro Series weight distribution system with friction sway control. To start off, we need our truck and trailer in a straight line, but separated. We'll go ahead and take a few measurements. First off, we want to make sure our trailer is level. Once you know you have your trailer level, we'll go ahead and measure from the ground to the top of the coupler. This is about 24 inches.





Ford F-150 Weight Distribution Questions

  • The first step in choosing the correct weight distribution (W/D) system is to determine the actual as-towed tongue weight of your trailer. Anything stowed in the bed of the truck behind the rear axle should be included as tongue weight. For best performance, the tongue weight of the trailer should fall as close as possible to the middle of the effective range of the system you choose. The Pro Series Weight Distribution System you mention is designed to operate most effectively...
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  • Pro Series does not recommend that you back up your trailer while using the Pro Series Weight Distribution System with Friction Sway Control, # PS49902. The reason behind this is that there is a very good possibility that the sway control system will bind up while backing up the trailer and this could damage your system. There is a quick and easy fix though. When you need to back up the trailer, you will need to switch the sway control lever to the off position, pull two clips,...
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  • When choosing a weight distribution system, you need to go by the tongue weight of the trailer when loaded and ready to tow plus the weight of anything loaded behind the rear axle of the tow vehicle. If you have the trailer at the max of 10,500 pounds and tongue weight is 1,050 to 1,575 (10 to 15 percent of gross trailer weight), that will tell you what weight range you will need in a weight distribution system. The 750 to 1,000 pound system that you referenced would not have...
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  • Based on the weight of the boat and trailer you mentioned, the gross trailer weight will be around 10,500 pounds. Typically on a boat trailer the tongue weight is less than on a utility trailer or travel trailer. At most you are probably looking at 10 percent or 1,050 pounds. But you will want to be sure. I have included a link to a help article explaining how you can determine the tongue weight of the trailer. You also have to add to the trailer tongue weight the weight of...
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  • The ideal choice of weight distribution system will be one where your loaded trailer tongue weight falls in the middle of the systems usable range. (A system that is too low in capacity will not provide the necessary stabilization; one rated too high will be stiff and result in erratic performance.) Please note that the weight of any gear in the truck bed placed behind the rear axle needs to be added to the tongue weight of the fully-loaded ready-to-roll trailer. If your actual...
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  • Yes, I do agree with your assessment that mechanical sway control would be a plus if needed. I would start off with a weight distribution system that is capable of having a dual cam sway control system added to it. This way you and get the weight distribution system installed and set up properly for your truck and trailer and then take it on a test run to see if sway control is needed. If it is not needed, you do not have money invested in the extra parts. If needed you can...
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  • The best way to pick out a weight distribution system is to base it off of the loaded tongue weight of the setup when it is loaded and ready to tow. This figure also includes the weight of any cargo behind the rear axle of the tow vehicle. I attached an FAQ on determining tongue weight for you to check out as well. You want to pick a system where the loaded tongue weight falls right into the middle of the tongue weight range of the system. Since your tongue weight is 975 lbs...
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  • If you go over the options, see link, ahead of time then you will not have to worry about returning a shank to get a different one! Basically, you will need to determine what rise or drop you will need in order to tow the trailer level and then get a shank that has the proper amount of rise or drop. I have included a link to an FAQ article that covers ball mounts but the same technique is used to determine the rise or drop needed for a weight distribution shank. Shanks for...
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  • There are a couple of things you can do to make uncoupling the trailer easier, depending on what is causing the problem. If the spring bars on the weight distribution system, # RP66022, are too tight, you may need to go back and set up the system as if you are just installing it for the first time. I have included a link to the installation details below for reference. Another thing you can do to release tension from tight spring bars is to use the trailer jack to lift up on...
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  • The High Performance Reese SC Weight Distribution System # RP66155 you referenced will work just fine with the tongue weight and gross trailer weight you provide. This system also has reactive sway control which means it only responds to trailer sway after sway has already started. I would recommend the Reese Strait-Line Weight Distribution Hitch System, part # RP66074. This system is designed for trailer with tongue weights ranging from 600 to 1200 lbs. The Strait-Line...
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  • I would definitely recommend using two sway controls especially if the trailer is 26 feet or longer or over 6000 lbs, see link to weight distribution questions and answer. Make sure the weight distribution system you are using has a hole for a ball to connect the additional sway control on the left side of the head unit, if not, you will want to look into weight distribution systems that allow for two sway controls. Another important note is to remove or disengage your sway...
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  • A weight distribution system transfers the load at the rear of the vehicle to all of the axles of the vehicle and the trailer. With the load distributed to all of the axles that will level off the vehicle and improve the performance and safety. On your Ford F-150 you will want to choose a weight distribution system that will have a tongue weight range that will be able to handle the trailers tongue weight. Tongue weight is 10 to 15 per cent of the gross trailer weight. On your...
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  • The pictures of Blue Ox Sway Pro systems # BXW0551 and # BXW0550 do suggest that the systems are the same. But the actual difference is that # BXW0550 has brackets that clamp onto the trailer frame and # BXW0551 has brackets that bolt to the sides of the trailer frame (requires drilling). I included a picture that shows what the bolt-on brackets look like. You would use the bolt on system if there were items mounted on the trailer frame that would interfere with the clamp on...
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  • From the weights you have listed it looks like you may at times have as much as 700 pounds of tongue weight with the weight loaded behind the rear axle in the truck. I would recommend the Reese SC Weight Distribution System, 800 lbs. TW / 10,000 lbs. GTW, item # RP66153, as long as your tongue weight will not exceed 800 lbs at any time. Another option, if you need sway control, would be the Reese Strait-Line Hitch 800 lbs TW / 12,000 lbs GTW, item # RP66073. The Strait-Line...
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  • The type of weight distribution that has brackets mounted on the frame and does not use chains is what is called a friction system because it uses friction style sway control. A chain system would use dual-cam sway control. The systems are just different designs like you have said. When choosing a system you want one that has a tongue weight capacity range that encompasses the total tongue weight of the trailer, loaded and ready to tow, plus the weight of anything loaded behind...
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  • On the 2006 Ford F150 Super Crew 4X4 with tow package, one of the first things we recommend to do is always check the owners manual or car dealer for the GCVWR (Gross Combined Vehicle Weight Rating). Which is the maximum weight capacity of your truck, trailer, and contents combined. So you want to make sure to never exceed that figure. The Reese Strait-Line Weight Distribution Hitch System 1,200lbs TW / 12,000 lbs GTW, # RP66074, is a great choice for your application. It gives...
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  • To choose a weight distribution system you will need to go by the total tongue weight of the set up. This is calculated by taking the tongue weight of the trailer, when loaded and ready to tow, and adding to that the weight of anything loaded behind the rear axle of the tow vehicle. The most important rating to use when matching up a weight distribution system is the actual tongue weight. The weight distribution I recommend is the Reese SC weight distribution with sway control...
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  • The need for a weight distribution and sway control system would depend on how much the trailer weighs loaded. With a trailer that small, I doubt you will need weight distribution as you are pulling with a full size pickup truck. The size of the ball will be stamped on the coupler, probably 2 inches. You will also need a ball mount. The best way to determine which size drop ball mount you need is to measure your hitch height and coupler height. Park the truck on level ground....
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  • When choosing a weight distribution system you will need to go by the tongue weight of the trailer when loaded and ready to tow plus the weight of anything loaded behind the rear axle of the truck. Tongue weight is typically 10 to 15 percent of the gross trailer weight so for a 5800 pound trailer the range would be 580 to 870 pound tongue weight (if the truck bed is empty). If you find that you will be inside of that range then a system rated for 600 to 1200 pounds tongue...
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  • To choose the proper weight distribution system you will need to go by the total tongue weight. This is calculated by taking the tongue weight of the trailer when loaded and ready to tow and adding to that the weight of anything loaded behind the rear axle of the truck. If the total tongue weight is below 800 pounds then you can use Reese SC system # RP66153 that you have referenced. It is likely that when loaded and ready to tow the tongue weight will at least exceed 600...
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