Best Wagon Weight Distributions

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Weight Distribution Questions

  • We will plan for the maximum gross trailer weight of 8,200 pounds. The dry tongue weight, 910, is right around 15 percent of the 6,300 dry weight. We can then estimate at 8,200 pounds trailer weight our tongue weight is 1,230 pounds. Since your tongue weight will be somewhere between 910 and 1,230 pounds, Reese Strait-Line Weight Distribution system, part # RP66074, would work perfect for you. It has the Dual-Cam Sway Control System which is the best system for a larger trailer,...
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  • The Eaz-Lift weight distribution systems use independent friction-style sway control, also known as bar-style sway control like the Pro Series Friction Sway Control Bar, # 83660. Since your trailers GTW is over 6,000 lbs, we recommend using two sway control units. One on the driver side and one on the passenger side. Two sway control units are also recommended for trailers that are 26 ft or longer. To install these units, you will bolt the ball plate to the side of the trailer...
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  • The best way to determine the maximum weight of the trailer you can safely tow is to subtract the weight of the fully loaded vehicle (curb weight plus weight of all cargo, driver and passengers) from the 12,500 GCVW. The figure you end up with will represent the maximum trailer weight you can safely tow. You would also need to check the capacity of your hitch, which might be different from the capacity of the truck itself. The trailer you tow cannot weigh any more that the capacity...
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  • You will hear arguments for both, the general consensus around etrailer.com is that trunnion systems are the better design. The bars are very easy to remove and install in the head. Since there is no bend in them, they are considered stronger and more durable. Since the head does not come down and the bars do not stick out of the bottom, there are less ground clearance issues. Some people argue that round bar systems are easier to adjust, but you set the brackets and head once...
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  • According to the online owner's manual for the 2010 Chevrolet Silverado 1500, there were three different V8 engines offered, 4.8L, 5.3L and 6.2L. These different powertrains, truck bed lengths, the presence of the heavy-duty cooling package and rear axle gear ratio all affect towing capacity. Maximum trailer weight ranges from 4700-lbs for the 4.8L with 3.23 axle up to 10,600-lbs for the 6.2L V8 NHT with trailering package and 3.73 axle. You will want to confirm in your owner's...
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  • Sway control is designed to be used in situations where the trailer sways under adverse conditions such as high winds or when large vehicles are passing causing the trailer to become unstable. Sway control also helps if you have to maneuver suddenly. Also if the trailer has a low tongue weight percentage the sway control can help to a point, but a weight distribution system will help more with this situation. The best solution for sway that is present without the above mentioned...
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  • I contacted Venture Trailers Inc. and found that the reason they do not recommend the use of a weight distribution system is because most weight distribution systems are not recommended for trailers with surge brakes because they do not allow the coupler to push into the coupler housing and engaging the brakes. Also due to the fact that they do apply additional stress on the tongue of the trailer like you said and this can be particularly harmful to aluminum frame trailers. There...
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  • Your salesman is correct in that a weight distribution system will, in most cases, allow a vehicle to tow additional weight, but the amount of additional weight is not a static number and is vehicle specific. You should check your owners manual, or the vehicle dealer, for hitch specifications for the Max Gross trailer weight allowable when using a weight distributing hitch. I checked the online owners manual for a 2007 Chevrolet Colorado. If this is the the vehicle you will...
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  • To determine if you can tow your 30 ft Dutchmen travel trailer with your 2003 Ford Explorer, you will want to find the towing capacity of your Explorer and compare that to the loaded and ready to tow weight of your trailer. I did some research on your Explorer and found that the Explorer will have different maximum tow ratings depending on how it is equipped. For 2WD models, if you have the 4.0L SOHC engine without a tow package, then the maximum towing capacity of your...
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  • You will need to check with the vehicle manufacturer or your specific vehicles owners manual to get the GCVWR (Gross Combined Vehicle Weight Rating) for your 2003 Ford Explorer V6. Once this is located you will need to subtract the gross weight of your vehicle fully loaded from the GCVWR and that will give you the total amount of weight the manufacturer allows for towing. You will also need to determine the weight ratings of the hitch on your Explorer, and whether it is designed...
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  • I spoke to my contact at Reese and he informed me that most likely you have a Reese Friction Sway Control, part # RP26660, because this product has not changed at all. I attached installation instructions for this product for you to check out. The handle is actually the on/off switch for the unit. To set the level of friction you will actually use the bolt that is below the on/off handle as it is the gain level. To get maximum benefits from the sway control assembly, a series...
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  • An equalizing hitch or weight distribution can sometimes increase the capacity of the receiver hitch, but the vehicle manufacturers stated towing capacity or rating will always be the final determination of how much the vehicle can tow. Any towing system will only be as strong as its lowest rated component. I would urge you to abide by the stated towing capacity of your truck. Failure to do so can cause the hitch to fail or damage drive train components on the vehicle.
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  • The first step in choosing the correct weight distribution (W/D) system is to determine the actual as-towed tongue weight of your trailer. Anything stowed in the bed of the truck behind the rear axle should be included as tongue weight. For best performance, the tongue weight of the trailer should fall as close as possible to the middle of the effective range of the system you choose. The Pro Series Weight Distribution System you mention is designed to operate most effectively...
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  • Yes, the Strait-Line Weight Distribution Hitch System can be adapted to a V-Nose style trailer. You would need to use an alternate mounting system for the chain hanger brackets. The Bolt on Chain Hanger Kit, item # RP58305, will bolt onto the side of trailer frame. Once installed the chains are attached by raising the trailer tongue and rear of vehicle with the trailer jack. Tubular frames cannot be wider than 2-1/4 inches with this hanger kit, so you will need to be sure and...
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  • The handle is actually the on/off switch for the unit and the bolt under the handle is the tension adjustment bolt. You will need to turn the On/Off handle clockwise (tighter) until the handle will stay firmly in place parallel with the main body of the sway control. Start out setting the sway control by testing with the adjustment bolt at the factory preset level of friction. You will need to perform a series of road tests with the loaded trailer. If there is not enough sway...
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  • You should have the hitch ball height set so that the trailer tows as level as possible behind your pickup. If there is a setting that goes between slightly higher than level and slightly lower than level, opt for the slightly lower setting, when the trailer is sitting on the trailer ball. An increase in tongue weight will most likely help with your sway situation. Adding weight in front of the trailer axles would be the best way to increase the tongue weight, just make sure...
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  • When choosing a weight distribution system, it is best to begin the process knowing the fully loaded and ready to tow tongue weight. The procedure for determining this is shown in the FAQ article I have linked you to. Since you are not able to confirm your tongue weight, please understand that anything I recommend will merely be an educated guess. I would recommend going with a 1,200 lb max capacity system to provide some cushion, since actual ready-to-roll tongue weight is...
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  • When selecting a weight distribution system for your towing needs, there are a few choices to make. The first and most important decision is to select a system that is properly rated for the capacity your setup requires. Since you have 4800 pounds gross trailer weight, I would recommend a weight distribution system with a 10000 pound gross weight and 600 pound tongue weight like the Strait-Line Weight Distribution System w Sway Control, item # RP66086, featuring dual-cam sway...
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  • The key to choosing the correct weight distribution system is knowing the tongue weight of your trailer when it is fully loaded and ready to tow. You should also keep in mind that anything loaded behind the rear axle of your 2013 Ford Explorer will contribute to the tongue weight as well. I would recommend choosing a system that has a tongue weight range that encompasses the tongue weight of your trailer with its heaviest load. The tongue weight of a trailer is typically calculated...
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  • Using an additional extender, like part # HE12, is very different than the rack, like part # SMC600, having a lengthy shank. The extenders like part # HE12 are usually made of two different sized pieces of steel that are welded together. The HE12 uses a 2x2 outer dimension piece of solid steel that inserts into the hitch. Welded to the other end, is a piece of tube with a 2x2 inside dimension. That joint is a weak spot. This is a large part of why most of the extenders have...
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