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Best Ford F-150 Weight Distributions

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Weight Distribution Videos

Pro Series Weight Distribution System Installation - 2004 Ford F-150

Today on this 2004 Ford F150 Super Cab, we're going to install Part number PS49902. This is a Pro Series weight distribution system with friction sway control. To start off, we need our truck and trailer in a straight line, but separated. We'll go ahead and take a few measurements. First off, we want to make sure our trailer is level. Once you know you have your trailer level, we'll go ahead and measure from the ground to the top of the coupler. This is about 24 inches.





Ford F-150 Weight Distribution Questions

  • To choose a weight distribution system you will need to go by the total tongue weight of the set up. This is calculated by taking the tongue weight of the trailer, when loaded and ready to tow, and adding to that the weight of anything loaded behind the rear axle of the tow vehicle. With a gross trailer weight of 7,800 pounds the tongue weight should be 780 to 1,170 pounds (10 to 15 percent of the gross trailer weight). The Reese SC system # RP66155 is rated for 600 to 1,200...
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  • If your fully-loaded trailer's tongue weight (TW) is consistently in the 900-lb range then the weight distribution/sway prevention system I suggest to give you the best possible performance is the Reese Strait-Line # RP66084. This Strait-Line uses trunnion style bars that provide better ground clearance at the hitch than round bar systems. The Strait-Line also includes a sway prevention feature that stops sway before it can start. Other systems do not prevent sway but only try...
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  • Weight distribution should be used any time the gross trailer weight is at least 50 percent of the gross vehicle weight. Since the trailer weighs 3,800 pounds it is likely more than half of the truck's weight so weight distribution would be a good idea. To choose a weight distribution system you will need to go by the total tongue weight of the set up. This is calculated by taking the tongue weight of the trailer, when loaded and ready to tow, and adding to that the weight...
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  • You're on the right track with the Reese Strait-Line. We consider it the champ of weight distribution (WD) and sway prevention systems. The key to selecting the correct Strait-Line system for your new 36-foot trailer is knowing your actual fully-loaded road-ready tongue weight (TW). Fill your water and propane tanks, load your gear and supplies and have the trailer loaded just the way you intend to when you head out. Then measure the TW with a scale like # 5780 or by one of...
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  • The best way to pick out a weight distribution system is to base it off of the loaded tongue weight of the setup when it is loaded and ready to tow. This figure also includes the weight of any cargo behind the rear axle of the tow vehicle. I attached a help article on determining tongue weight for you to check out as well. You will want the loaded tongue weight of your setup to fall right in the middle of the tongue weight range of the system you use. You mentioned that the...
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  • Tongue weight is the important factor when choosing a weight distribution system. Based on my research, the 2015 Rockwood Windjammer 3025W has a gross weight of 9,050 pounds and a tongue weight of 971 pounds. I recommend double checking to make sure this is correct for your trailer's tongue weight. I have attached a help article on finding tongue weight for you. For your trailer, I recommend the Reese Strait-Line Weight Distribution System with Sway Control # RP66084. Reese's...
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  • To choose a weight distribution system you will need to go by the total tongue weight of the set up. This is calculated by taking the tongue weight of the trailer, when loaded and ready to tow, and adding to that the weight of anything loaded behind the rear axle of the tow vehicle. For a 6,000 pound gross weight trailer the tongue weight would be around 600 to 900 pounds (10 to 15 percent of the gross trailer weight). The Curt TruTrack Weight Distribution System # C17500 is...
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  • The best way to pick out a weight distribution system is to base it off of the loaded tongue weight of the setup when it is loaded and ready to tow. This figure also includes the weight of any cargo behind the rear axle of the tow vehicle. I attached a help article on determining tongue weight for you to check out as well. You will want the loaded tongue weight of your setup to fall right in the middle of the tongue weight range of the system you use. The Blue Ox SwayPro...
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  • Based on the maximum weight of the trailer, I assume you mainly need weight distribution when the trailer is loaded enough to cause sagging. When choosing a weight distribution system, the key figure is your total tongue weight. The total tongue weight is the loaded and ready to tow tongue weight of the trailer plus the weight of any cargo loaded in the tow vehicle behind the rear axle. Weight distribution systems have effective tongue weight ranges, so I recommend looking...
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  • It sounds like you have a Reese SC system such as # RP66151. The friction pads are similar to metallic disc brake pads and could shows signs of corrosion. It would get rubbed off during the first trip towing the trailer so no worries. You will not want to grease the spring bars or the friction pads. The friction is how the sway control feature works. If you used grease there would be no friction and thus no sway control! When hooking up you will couple the truck and trailer...
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  • You want to tow your trailer with the towing system as level as possible. You can count on up to about 1-1/2 inches of squat when you hook the trailer up so you can adjust your ball height so that it is about an inch or so to compensate for the squat when the trailer is connected.
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  • The Equalizer # EQ37121ET that you referenced has 3/4 inch holes that are spaced 1-1/4 inches apart. If the shank of your Eaz system is compatible with that this the WD system would work well for you. Nearly all WD system use the same hole dimensions. We have found that almost all brands can use each others shanks.
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  • The Reese WD System part # RP66074 that you referenced has 3/4 inch holes that are spaced 1-1/4 inches apart. If the shank of your Eaz system is compatible with that this the WD system would work well for you. Nearly all WD system use the same hole dimensions. We have found that almost all brands can use each others shanks.
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  • The best way to pick out a weight distribution system is to base it off of the loaded tongue weight of the setup when it is loaded and ready to tow. This figure also includes the weight of any cargo behind the rear axle of the tow vehicle. I attached a help article on determining tongue weight for you to check out as well. You will want the loaded tongue weight of your setup to fall right in the middle of the tongue weight range of the system you use. If your loaded tongue...
    view full answer...

  • To choose a weight distribution system you will need to go by the total tongue weight of the set up. This is calculated by taking the tongue weight of the trailer, when loaded and ready to tow, and adding to that the weight of anything loaded behind the rear axle of the tow vehicle. If the trailer weighs 7,700 pounds then the tongue weight should be 770 to 1,155 pounds which is 10 to 15 percent of the gross trailer weight but it could be higher. Based on the design of the...
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  • Your truck most likely has plenty of capacity for the TT you mention, but I'd recommend determining its towing capacity. On the drivers side door jamb, you find the ratings sticker. Find the GCWR, which stands for gross combined weight rating. This is the maximum amount that the vehicle and the trailer can weigh. From the GCWR, subtract the curb weight of the vehicle and the weight of passengers and gear typically carried in the truck. Your remaining amount is the maximum trailer...
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  • To use the Dual Cam style sway control you will have to have spring bars that have the angled ends on them for the cams to ride on. Depending on which Pro Series system you have and it's bar style it is possible for you to upgrade the bars and then install the dual cam setup. But by the time you spend the money it's going to be a better idea to just upgrade the entire system. Doing this will give you all new parts and could allow you to sell your current system second hand. You...
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  • I have a solution for your car hauler needs. A weight distribution system will distribute some of the tongue weight to the front axle of the tow vehicle. This will help with sag and allow your setup to brake and handle better. When picking out a weight distribution you want to do it based on the loaded tongue weight, which also includes the weight of the cargo behind the rear axle. Typically it is 10-15 percent of your Gross Trailer Weight (GTW). For your fully loaded 9,000...
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  • Depends on the trailer honestly. The bolt on WD system brackets like what come with # BXW1004 are great for use on trailer frames that have accessories above the frame that would make installing the brackets difficult. The clamp on brackets have the advantage of not requiring drilling into the trailer frame. So if you don't have clearance issues on your trailer # BXW1003 would be the better route. For a 2 inch ball you would want part # A-90 and for a 2-5/16 inch ball # 19286.
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  • If your total tongue weight does end up being 1,300 pounds then the Blue Ox SwayPro system rated for 1,500 pounds tongue weight, # BXW1500, is a good option. I doubt the trailer frame has been weakened at all. Trailer frames in general are pretty tough but you should be able to determine if there is any cause for concern once you remove the old brackets. If it is rusted out underneath or looks like Swiss cheese then some repair work would be in order first. Ball # 19286...
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