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Best Ford F-150 Weight Distributions

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Weight Distribution Videos

Pro Series Weight Distribution System Installation - 2004 Ford F-150

Today on this 2004 Ford F150 Super Cab, we're going to install Part number PS49902. This is a Pro Series weight distribution system with friction sway control. To start off, we need our truck and trailer in a straight line, but separated. We'll go ahead and take a few measurements. First off, we want to make sure our trailer is level. Once you know you have your trailer level, we'll go ahead and measure from the ground to the top of the coupler. This is about 24 inches.





Ford F-150 Weight Distribution Questions

  • Since it is likely that your trailer's tongue weight will likely end up around 950 pounds when it is fully loaded and ready to tow, and with an additional 100 pounds behind the rear axle in the bed of your truck, I recommend going with the larger 12,000 pound towing, 1,200 pound tongue weight rated Equal-I-zer Weight distribution system # EQ37120ET. With the total tongue weight coming in right at, or even possibly above, the capacity of the 1,000 pound system, the higher rated...
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  • If you are just using one friction control bar, it is not sufficient enough for an 8,000 lbs. 35 ft. trailer. You will need two friction control bars if your spring bars have the hook at the end. If you do, you can add the dual-cam sway control # RP26002 and it will work much better. However, if you do not have two notches, towing a trailer that is close to the maximum towing limit of your truck can cause significant sway on the highway even with a weight distribution system....
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  • The best way to pick out a weight distribution system is to base it off of the loaded tongue weight of the setup when it is loaded and ready to tow. This figure also includes the weight of any cargo behind the rear axle of the tow vehicle. I attached a help article on determining tongue weight for you to check out as well. You will want the loaded tongue weight of your setup to fall right in the middle of the tongue weight range of the system you use. If your trailer was...
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  • Thank you for the details about your towing set-up; your typing is also darn good for having been done on a smartphone. The Reese Strait-Line dual cam trunnion weight distribution system # RP66084 works with tongue weight (TW) ranging from 600- to 1200-lbs. This makes it ideally suited to your anticipated loaded tongue weight of about 1000-lbs. Note that you also need to factor in the weight of anything in the truck bed that sits behind the rear axle, say a loaded cooler or...
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  • To choose a weight distribution system you will need to go by the total tongue weight of the set up. This is calculated by taking the tongue weight of the trailer, when loaded and ready to tow, and adding to that the weight of anything loaded behind the rear axle of the tow vehicle. With a gross trailer weight of 7,800 pounds the tongue weight should be 780 to 1,170 pounds (10 to 15 percent of the gross trailer weight). The Reese SC system # RP66155 is rated for 600 to 1,200...
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  • The trailer hitch does not determine the towing capacity for the vehicle. A trailer hitch will have towing capacities for the hitch and will change when a weight distribution system is used but that does not change the towing capacity for the truck itself. I did some research and found that you are able to tow your trailer that weighs 6800 lbs if you have a 3.5L turbocharged engine or if your truck has a bigger engine than the 3.5L. We do offer several trailer hitches...
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  • The best way to pick out a weight distribution system is to base it off of the loaded tongue weight of the setup when it is loaded and ready to tow. This figure also includes the weight of any cargo behind the rear axle of the tow vehicle. I attached a help article on determining tongue weight for you to check out as well. You will want the loaded tongue weight of your setup to fall right in the middle of the tongue weight range of the system you use. If you have a 720 lb...
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  • If you are using a basic weight distribution system that does not have integrated anti-sway, then you can add on a friction type unit such as Pro Series # 83660 or one of the other similar items shown on the linked page. Installation on a 2-inch ball mount will require use of sway bracket # RP26003 which is held in place by your hitch ball. Do note that friction type anti-sway units like these must be disengaged before you back up the trailer or they will be damaged.
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  • A properly rated and set up weight distribution system will not also require an air bag system. So all we need for your truck is the correct WD system! So to pick out the best system we have to go by the loaded tongue weight figure which includes the weight of any cargo behind the rear axle. Typically tongue weight is 10-15 percent of the total trailer weight though, not 5 percent. So if your trailer weighs 7,643 lbs you would be looking at 764 to 1,146 lbs of tongue weight....
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  • First, since your V-nose trailer frame is aluminum I advise you to speak with the trailer manufacturer to make sure you can use weight distribution. If it can then we will have an option that will work with the trailer. Because you have such little available space and a high tongue weight it does limit what will fit. Basically the only one that will work is Reese SC weight distribution system # RP66155. Its brackets can be mounted as little as 24 inches back measured from...
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  • When a suitably-rated weight distribution/sway control system is properly installed in a towing setup like yours there will still be SOME effect from a vehicle like an 18-wheeler passing you in the opposite direction. No system can prevent this totally. And as driving speed increases the effects of wind/passing vehicles will only increase too. Slowing down is the easiest, cheapest and safest way to avoid this. I do realize that in parts of the USA the posted highway speed limit...
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  • The best way to determine which weight distribution system to get is to know the total tongue weight. This would be the tongue weight of your ready-to-tow fully-loaded trailer added to the weight of any cargo placed behind the rear axle of your truck. If you are towing a trailer weighing 5,500-lbs the tongue weight should be somewhere between 550 and 825 lbs. Add 200 lbs of cargo and you are around 1025-lbs of tongue weight. I would recommend the Fastway e2 Weight Distribution...
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  • To choose a weight distribution system you will need to go by the total tongue weight of the set up. This is calculated by taking the tongue weight of the trailer, when loaded and ready to tow, and adding to that the weight of anything loaded behind the rear axle of the tow vehicle. If the gross weight of each trailer is 7,000 pounds that would put the tongue weight range at 700 to 1,050 pounds. Based on that I recommend going with the 1,000 pound system # C17052 over an 800...
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  • There are a couple things that are most important when choosing a weight distribution system. First you want to make sure the system is big enough to handle the trailer you are towing for obvious reasons. Second, you want to know your total tongue weight which is the tongue weight of your fully-loaded-ready-to-tow trailer added to the weight of any cargo you are carrying behind the rear axle of your truck. Ideally you want the total tongue weight to fall in the middle of the tongue...
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  • You would need to basically just follow the procedure listed in the instructions for whichever weight distribution system you go with. Once you allow the auto-leveling of the vehicle do it's thing you would then just go through the setup procedure as it is outlined in the instructions. Since the procedure is a little different for each WD system and I am not entirely sure which system you have that's as specific as I can be. If you check out the install video I attached for...
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  • You would want to use a weight distribution system but I would recommend disconnecting the spring bars while you are backing the trailer down the ramp. You would be fine without the system connected for just this short distance. Especially since the boat is going to come off the trailer at the bottom of the ramp and it's not really a great idea to back up a trailer with a WD system connected. Since you have a pole tongue style of trailer you would need to use the adapter part...
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  • The part you are talking about is a bushing and used in the top of the head if you have a smaller shank hitch ball. Typically a 1-1/4 inch shank hitch ball is used but if you have a 1-inch shank on the hitch ball it can be inserted into the hitch ball opening and used on your e2 system.
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  • Yes, the shank of the Fastway e2 Weight Distribution System # FA94-00-1061 can be used either direction for rise or drop. The replacement shank is part #
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  • Depends on the trailer honestly. The bolt on WD system brackets like what come with # BXW1004 are great for use on trailer frames that have accessories above the frame that would make installing the brackets difficult. The clamp on brackets have the advantage of not requiring drilling into the trailer frame. So if you don't have clearance issues on your trailer # BXW1003 would be the better route. For a 2 inch ball you would want part # A-90 and for a 2-5/16 inch ball # 19286.
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  • Your truck most likely has plenty of capacity for the TT you mention, but I'd recommend determining its towing capacity. On the drivers side door jamb, you find the ratings sticker. Find the GCWR, which stands for gross combined weight rating. This is the maximum amount that the vehicle and the trailer can weigh. From the GCWR, subtract the curb weight of the vehicle and the weight of passengers and gear typically carried in the truck. Your remaining amount is the maximum trailer...
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